Skip to main content

Toronto Toronto property values surge, but condo gains lag

Toronto homeowners may get a shock later this month when they open their property assessment notices to find the value of their home has jumped nearly 50 per cent.

The latest assessment data released by the Municipal Property Assessment Corp., which conducts assessments on more than 5 million residential properties in the province once every four years, show property values in the City of Toronto have appreciated 30 per cent on average over the past four years.

Across the city, property values for single-family homes jumped 36 per cent since 2012, to an average of $770,000, compared with a 12-per-cent gain for condos, which now have an average value of $363,000.

Here's a breakdown of how property values have changed across the city:

Property value assessments for City of Toronto

Click or tap arrow to see condo values

Residential Overall Change per year since 2012Single Family Home Change per year since 2012 Single Family Home Typical AssessmentCondo Change per year since 2012Typical Condo Assessment
Scarborough10%11%$625,0005%$270,000
Toronto5%9%$1.17 million3%$423,000
East York9%10%$745,0003%$264,000
North York7%9%$1.015 million3%$351,000
York8%8%$579,0006%$269,000
Etobicoke7%7%$714,0003%$312,000

Source: MPAC

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Latest Videos