Skip to main content

Alberta’s Frontier oil sands mine ordered to address impact on world heritage site

The federal-provincial panel conducting an environmental review of the proposed Frontier oil sands mine project in northern Alberta has been ordered to consider its impact on Wood Buffalo National Park as requested by the United Nations’ World Heritage Committee.

courtesy of Parks Canada

The federal-provincial panel conducting an environmental review of the proposed Frontier oil sands mine project in northern Alberta has been ordered to consider its impact on Wood Buffalo National Park as requested by the United Nations' World Heritage Committee.

In a report in March based on a visit to the 45,000-square-kilometre park, a world heritage site since 1983, the UN agency warned of risk from industrial development and said the park could be designated "in danger" if Canada didn't implement 17 recommendations.

It set a deadline of February, 2018, for Canada to show its plan to meet those recommendations and another deadline of December, 2018, to show progress.

Story continues below advertisement

According to the report, the Frontier project would move oil sands development closer to the southern boundary of the park, increasing the risk that it and its herd of wood bison might be affected by leaks and spills from tailings ponds and other water and air pollution.

The panel is to consider potential environmental effects of the project on the value of the world heritage site, including the Peace-Athabasca Delta, and address it in a separate chapter of its report.

Project proponent Teck Resources Ltd. has said oil production at the 260,000-barrel-a-day Frontier won't take place until 2026 at the earliest.

Report an error
Tickers mentioned in this story
Unchecking box will stop auto data updates
Comments

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

If your comment doesn't appear immediately it has been sent to a member of our moderation team for review

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.