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Bombardier said last week that it is reducing its production rate for Global 5000 and Global 6000 business jets. About 1,000 jobs will be cut in the Montreal region, up to 480 in Toronto and up to 280 in Belfast in Northern Ireland.

CLEMENT SABOURIN/AFP/Getty Images

The management upheaval continues at Bombardier Inc.

The plane and train maker says that Eric Martel, the president of its business-aircraft division, is leaving the company less than two years after his appointment to the position.

He is to be replaced by David Coleal, executive vice-president and general manager of Spirit AeroSystems Holdings Inc.

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Mr. Coleal was vice-president and general manager of Bombardier Learjet before joining Spirit.

Mr. Martel is leaving Montreal-based Bombardier to "pursue other career opportunities" after 13 years at both Bombardier Aerospace and rail unit Bombardier Transportation, Bombardier said.

The latest shakeup – under recently appointed chief executive officer Alain Bellemare – comes after Bombardier said last week it is slashing 1,750 business-jet jobs in Montreal, Toronto and Belfast and slowing production of its long-range Global 5000/6000 line of business jets.

Mr. Bellemare, who took over from Pierre Beaudoin in February, has moved quickly to put his stamp on the struggling aerospace division, which has been caught up in major cost overruns, delays on its new C Series jetliner program and has been stretched thin on some of its other plane-development projects.

Bombardier also said late Monday it has hired procurement expert Jean-Paul Pellissier as a special adviser to conduct a sweeping review of the company's supply chain.

Among other recent senior executive changes: Fred Cromer was appointed head of Bombardier Commercial Aircraft last month; industry veteran Colin Bole joined as salesman-in-chief of the C Series jet earlier this month, replacing Raymond Jones, who left abruptly in January; and former CEO of International Lease Finance Corp., Henri Courpron, was hired as an adviser with a mandate to review Bombardier Commercial Aircraft's operations.

Bombardier Business Aircraft forecast on Tuesday strong demand for business jets over the longer term. It predicts a total of 9,000 business jet deliveries from 2015 to 2024 in the segments in which it competes, representing $267-billion (U.S.) in industry revenues.

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Bombardier anticipates delivering 210 business aircraft in 2015.

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