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Taking short breaks during the workday will not necessarily revitalize you but could be helpful if you use the time to do something positive and work-related, says Harvard Business Review.

Most people assume it's good to take a few breaks during the day – grab a coffee, make a personal call, check Facebook – and then return to work refreshed.

But those non-work related breaks may be making you more tired and distracted. Detaching from work is only beneficial if it's over a longer period of time.

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If you need a break – and we all do – try writing out a to-do list or giving a colleague a compliment instead of drinking a caffeinated beverage or listening to music.

If you do something work-related during those brief times you'll be more engaged and energized. At the end of the day, you can punch out and pursue those non-work conversations and hobbies.

Today's management tip was adapted from " Coffee Breaks Don't Boost Productivity After All" by Charlotte Fritz.

Reuters

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