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Stephen Mallory, chief executive and founder of Directors Global Insurance Brokers Ltd., was in church one Sunday morning when he heard a presentation by a woman who was raising money to build water wells in the developing world. The need for fresh water struck him: ‘$8,500 can buy 1,000 people clean water for 25 years,’ Mr. Mallory said.

Mark Blinch/The Globe and Mail

The donor: Stephen Mallory

The gift: Raising $25,500

The cause: The Water for Life Initiative

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The reason: To bring fresh water to millions of people in need

Stephen Mallory was in church one Sunday morning when he heard a presentation by a woman who was raising money to build water wells in the developing world.

The need for fresh water struck him: "$8,500 can buy 1,000 people clean water for 25 years," said Mr. Mallory, who is chief executive and founder of Directors Global Insurance Brokers Ltd., a Toronto-based risk management advisory firm.

The presentation prompted him to consider launching his own fundraising campaign, with a twist.

Mr. Mallory, who once played in a band, contacted more than a dozen friends in business and music, ranging from musicians to graphic artists and web designers.

The group put together a rock album with 10 original songs, calling themselves the Cherry Trees Band.

Their album – Change the World – is up for sale on iTunes, Amazon and other sites, at a price of $10. All the money raised will go to the Water for Life Initiative run by the Global Aid Network, a Canadian charity that funds development projects around the world. The group is hoping to raise $25,500, enough for three wells.

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"In Canada, we are fortunate people," Mr. Mallory said. "And we take water for granted … This project has been very inspiring."

pwaldie@globeandmail.com

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