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What workplace issue will finally convince you it's time to make the change?

According to a new FlexJobs survey, striking a work-life balance is the top reason people search for a new career.

The Boulder, Colo.-based online service, which offers to find professionals jobs in which they can telecommute, enjoy a flexible schedule, work part-time or freelance, has identified the top reasons that have today's employees considering jumping ship – and it's not always all about the money.

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For many job seekers and career-changers, the decision hinges on control.

"They feel they can't take care of their personal lives, that work is the all-consuming thing and that they don't have that ability to take breaks for doctor's appointments or take a real vacation … or be there for their children's school activities," Brie Weiler Reynolds, director of online content at FlexJobs, said.

59 per cent of the pool of 1,000 respondents said a work-life balance was one reason they would consider a career change.

"They don't feel that they have that ability to do both – to be a good professional – and a good family member, friend, etc.," Ms. Reynolds said.

While many struggle with the idea of having it all, other career-changers are looking for more fulfillment from their careers. Forty-seven per cent of respondents said a desire for more meaningful work would drive them when making the decision.

Ms. Reynolds said this sort of meaningful position can be anything from an NGO to a corporation that resonates with a person in some particular way. She pointed to teaching as a good example of a career where people feel they're making a difference.

Escaping stress is yet another reason people may look for a career change, with 40 per cent saying pressure in their current position could drive them to move on.

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So what's holding people back from making a change? FlexJobs found that the top reason was concerns about pay, cited by just more than half the people surveyed.

A lack of education or training for a new career was a concern of 45 per cent of respondents.

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