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There's a reason they have two sides

Making a business decision by flipping a coin seems dangerously dumb, but entrepreneur Seth Godin argues sometimes it's the correct move. In 1986, when considering pricing for a brand of software his company was launching, they had no data, no history, and no graphs, so after an hour discussion the folks in the room - several with prestigious MBAs - did the only intelligent thing they could: Flip a coin to choose. "When there isn't enough data, when there can't be enough data, insist on the flip," he urges. Seth's blog

Nothing ever takes just a few minutes

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If you're on vacation and something comes to mind that will only take five minutes to handle right then, don't do it. It always takes more than five minutes, insists freelance designer Patrik Larsson. Leave it for your return. Freelanceswitch.com

Have confidence to disagree but do it wisely

When interviewing job candidates, David Kelley, founder of the Palo Alto, Calif.-based creativity house Ideo, looks for those who are confident enough to disagree with him. At the same time, he wants them to be questioning whether they are right or wrong and whether there is a better solution than what they are advancing. In short, he wants a balance between confidence and questioning. FastCompany.com

Online aid to manage your many to-do lists

Wieldy is a to-do task manager that follows the principles of David Allen's popular "Getting Things Done" system. It allows you to create to-dos as thoughts and actions, which can then be assigned to the Next Action, Today, or Someday categories. Neat Net Tricks Premium Edition

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