Skip to main content

Chrystia Freeland answers a question during a meeting with staff members at the Thomson Reuters head office in New York, April 19. 2011.

Gary Hershorn/Reuters

Since the phrase "the 1 per cent" came to signify more than a just a number, income inequality has become a subject of hot debate in policy circles. Chrystia Freeland was awarded the 28th annual National Business Book Award on Tuesday for her work examining "the .01 per cent" – the superrich – and their impact on the economy and on politics.

Ms. Freeland, managing director and editor of consumer news at Thomson Reuters and weekly columnist for The Globe and Mail, was honoured at a lunch event in Toronto for her book Plutocrats: The Rise of the New Global Super-Rich and the Fall of Everyone Else.

This shift to a new breed of ultra-wealthy elites, Ms. Freeland writes, is a global trend and "a new reality that will shape the future."

Story continues below advertisement

Ms. Freeland is a former deputy editor of The Globe. Her column appears on Fridays in the Report on Business.

The $20,000 award celebrates books published in Canada each year that represent "outstanding talent in business writing." The other nominees this year were Bernie Finkelstein, for True North: A Life in the Music Business; Douglas Hunter, for Double Double: How Tim Hortons Became a Canadian Way of Life One Cup at a Time; and Amanda Lang for The Power of Why.

The Globe and Mail is the media sponsor of the awards.

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Tickers mentioned in this story
Unchecking box will stop auto data updates
Comments

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • All comments will be reviewed by one or more moderators before being posted to the site. This should only take a few moments.
  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed. Commenters who repeatedly violate community guidelines may be suspended, causing them to temporarily lose their ability to engage with comments.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.
Cannabis pro newsletter