Skip to main content

Anonymity may be fine for some. But to Douglas Caldwell, chairman of Caldwell Partners International Inc., no good deed should go unrewarded.

It's part of the reason he founded Canada's Top 40 Under 40 - to celebrate unheralded young leaders and give them the recognition they deserve.

"We celebrate our hockey players, artists and literary talents quite well," Mr. Caldwell says. "But we're really lousy, as Canadians, in praising and applauding achievement in other fields."

Story continues below advertisement

Founded in 1995 by the executive search firm, the awards were established to honour men and women who have become outstanding leaders in their fields before the age of 40. Winners hail from all parts of the country and work in all sectors of life, whether in the public, private or not-for-profit sectors.

Recipients undergo a rigorous process for qualification. After filling out an application, the candidates are judged by an independent advisory board made up of 26 industry and community leaders chosen by Caldwell Partners. Past winners are represented on the board.

The board assesses candidates using five basic criteria: vision and leadership, innovation and achievements, the impact of their efforts, growth and strategy development, and community involvement.

Indeed, it's this last category that often proves to be most important. "This isn't just about financial performance and making money," Mr. Caldwell says. "Sometimes people put all their energies into making a go of their business or climbing the corporate ladder, and they kind of forget about the other aspects of life. We spotlight the high achievers who don't."

This year's committee sifted through more than 1,400 nominees to come up with the 40 individuals profiled on these pages.

And membership, of course, has its privileges.

Winners are flown to Toronto this week where, in addition to being fêted at a luncheon and participating in a leadership workshop, they will rub elbows with some of the most stimulating people in the country - each other.

Story continues below advertisement

"There's a very strong network of alumni," Mr. Caldwell says.

"The real value of the program is the talent of the individuals and how they keep on performing in their field after they've been recognized."

The top forty:

Richard Baxter, 39 British Columbia

Jean-François Bouchard, 38 Quebec

Eric Boyko, 36 Quebec

Story continues below advertisement

Neil Branda, 39 British Columbia

Ken Brooks, 37 Quebec

John Chambers, 39 Alberta

Tom Chau, 36 Ontario

Frank Cianciulli, 34 Ontario

David Dobbin, 36 Ontario

Story continues below advertisement

Mark Fraser, 34 Nova Scotia

Brendan Frey, 38 Ontario

James Harbilas, 37 Alberta

Cameron Heaps, 32 Ontario

Patrick Keeley, 37 Ontario

Johann Koss, 38 Ontario

Patrick Lamarre, 35 Ontario

Paul Langill, 39 Ontario

Kirstine Layfield, 39 Ontario

Katherine MacMillan, 37 Ontario

Joe Makowecki, 38 Alberta

Samir Manji, 37 British Columbia

Isabelle Marcoux, 37 Quebec

Tom Mawhinney, 38 Alberta

Wade Miller, 33 Manitoba

Ravinder Minhas, 24 Alberta

Mark O'Dea, 39 British Columbia

Patrick O'Regan, 36 Nova Scotia

Seamus O'Regan, 35 Ontario

Benjamin Peterson, 29 Ontario

Wayne Purboo, 39 Ontario

Vivek Rao, 39 Ontario

Aaron Schimmer, 38 Ontario

Jeff Sharpe, 35, and Matthew Young, 35 British Columbia

Dwayne Smithers, 39 Nova Scotia

Alim Somani, 28 Ontario

Jon Stanfield, 35 Nova Scotia

Sergei Tchetvertnykh, 39 Ontario

Susan Tighe, 36 Ontario

Sherah VanLaerhoven, 35 Ontario

Mark Wiseman, 36 Ontario

Report an error
Comments

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • All comments will be reviewed by one or more moderators before being posted to the site. This should only take a few moments.
  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed. Commenters who repeatedly violate community guidelines may be suspended, causing them to temporarily lose their ability to engage with comments.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.
Cannabis pro newsletter