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A load of lumber is trucked through the forest surrounding Edmondston, New Brunswick, Canada in this September 2001 photo. International Paper Co., Temple-Inland Inc. and other U.S. lumber companies rejected plans to end a dispute over $7 billion of Canadian lumber imports, a Canadian official said, causing talks to break down. (NORM BETTS/BLOOMBERG NEWS)
A load of lumber is trucked through the forest surrounding Edmondston, New Brunswick, Canada in this September 2001 photo. International Paper Co., Temple-Inland Inc. and other U.S. lumber companies rejected plans to end a dispute over $7 billion of Canadian lumber imports, a Canadian official said, causing talks to break down. (NORM BETTS/BLOOMBERG NEWS)

New Brunswick Premier touts U.S. ties, stresses industry integration in softwood lumber spat Add to ...

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New Brunswick Premier Brian Gallant is hoping the tale of Twin Rivers Paper Co. Inc. will help resolve the softwood lumber dispute between Canada and the United States.

The economic damage from the softwood battle isn’t isolated to lumber, as evidenced by the ripple effect across other parts of the forestry sector, such as pulp and paper, he said.

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Softwood lumber tariffs ‘consistent’ with U.S. approach: Trudeau (The Canadian Press)

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