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British Columbia Premier Christy Clark, third left, speaks as Jim Carr, from left to right, Minister of Natural Resources, Catherine McKenna, Minister of Environment and Climate Change, and Dominic LeBlanc, Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, listen after the federal government announced approval of the Pacific NorthWest LNG project, at the Sea Island Coast Guard Base, in Richmond, B.C., on Tuesday September 27, 2016. (DARRYL DYCK/THE CANADIAN PRESS)
British Columbia Premier Christy Clark, third left, speaks as Jim Carr, from left to right, Minister of Natural Resources, Catherine McKenna, Minister of Environment and Climate Change, and Dominic LeBlanc, Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, listen after the federal government announced approval of the Pacific NorthWest LNG project, at the Sea Island Coast Guard Base, in Richmond, B.C., on Tuesday September 27, 2016. (DARRYL DYCK/THE CANADIAN PRESS)

Ottawa’s oil and gas balancing act: building industry, protecting climate Add to ...

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The Liberal government is walking a tricky line with the country’s oil and gas industry, trying to reposition Canada as a leader in the battle against climate change while at the same time approving projects that will boost oil and gas exports.

With his rhetorical “Canada is back” flourishes and his “pan-Canadian carbon strategy,” Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is, in effect, leading a national rebranding effort. The Prime Minister is proffering an implicit bargain with industry that some pain on the environmental front will lead to real gains for the sector’s export ambitions and long-term viability.

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