Skip to main content

Thai anti-smoking campaign uses children to deliver message

A fascinating ad from Ogilvy & Mather, cherub-faced kids walk up to smokers on the streets of Thailand holding cigarettes in their tiny fingers and asking for a light. The smokers refuse, explaining to the kids why smoking is bad for them. After listening patiently to each lecture, the child would hand the smoker a folded-up note and walk away.

Thinkstock/Thinkstock

As a rule, smokers don't like to be lectured. So how do you create yet one more anti-smoking campaign that might actually make smokers think?

Use that perfect tool of manipulation: children. A fascinating ad from Ogilvy & Mather Bangkok failed to grab a prize at the Cannes advertising festival this week, though it did end up on the shortlist for the Promo & Activation category, and has caught some attention online.

In the video, cherub-faced kids walk up to smokers on the streets of Thailand holding cigarettes in their tiny fingers and asking for a light. The smokers refuse, explaining to the kids why smoking is bad for them. After listening patiently to each lecture, the child would hand the smoker a folded-up note and walk away.

Story continues below advertisement

"You worry about me. But why not about yourself?" the note read. It then gave the number of the Thai Health Promotion Foundation's hotline to help smokers quit.

An extreme rarity for such street campaigns, most of the adults did not throw away the brochures they were handed. According to the agency, phone calls from smokers went up 40 per cent in the wake of the campaign.

The vice-chairman of Ogilvy Group, Rory Sutherland, speaks publicly about the way consumers' brains make decisions. One of the points he likes to make is that a message has a much higher chance of getting through if delivered in the proper context. In an interview with the Globe last month, he described one of his favourite campaigns from the global network in the past year – and it demonstrated a similar contextual intervention that the Thai anti-smoking campaign does.

"One of the first rules that you learn from brain science is that we make decisions contextually," Mr. Sutherland said, describing another campaign from Ogilvy Brazil that detected items being rung up at the grocery store and then printed up a recipe using those ingredients and the client's product, Hellmann's mayonnaise, to make a meal. "That's the kind of moment-of-truth intervention which absolutely delights me. I think it's very, very smart."

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Discussion loading ...

Cannabis pro newsletter