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The Globe and Mail

The dwindling days of coal delivery in Germany

There are 30,000 Berlin households that still use coal heating. Follow coal delivery man Henry Schulz as he works a job that, he believes, will no longer exist once he reaches retirement age.

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Coal delivery man Henry Schulz loads his lorry with combustible fuel in Berlin on Feb. 5, 2013. Mr. Schulz, 53, has been working as a coal delivery man for more than 30 years.

THOMAS PETER/REUTERS

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Mr. Schulz fills baskets with coal. He works for Helmut Braun Combustible Fuel, a three-man company that is one of the few remaining coal retailers in Berlin.

THOMAS PETER/REUTERS

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Mr. Schulz's tattoos are shown as he rests on a shovel at the Helmut Braun Combustible Fuel retailer.

THOMAS PETER/REUTERS

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Mr. Schulz searches for an address as he drives to a customer in Berlin. On a busy day he carries up to 10 tons of coal into the basements or flats of his customers.

THOMAS PETER/REUTERS

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Mr. Schulz carries packages of coal into the basement of a customer. There are roughly 30,000 Berlin household that still use coal heating.

THOMAS PETER/REUTERS

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Mr. Schulz holds a basket that he uses to carry coal. He says that business is in decline and that the job will no longer exist by the time he reaches retirement age.

THOMAS PETER/REUTERS

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Mr. Schulz carries packages of coal into the basement of a customer.

THOMAS PETER/REUTERS

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Mr. Schulz unloads coal into the basement of a customer.

THOMAS PETER/REUTERS

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