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Aubrey McClendon was charged on March 1, 2016, with conspiring to rig bids to buy oil and natural gas leases in Oklahoma, the Justice Department said.

SEAN GARDNER/REUTERS

State officials say investigations into the death of energy magnate Aubrey McClendon in a fiery single-car crash in Oklahoma City could take months to complete.

Oklahoma City Police Sgt. Ashley Peters says a probe of Wednesday's crash likely will take up to two weeks, while the state medical examiner's office says an autopsy investigation could take as long as three months.

Police say McClendon's Chevrolet Tahoe slammed into a concrete embankment and burst into flames, killing the 56-year-old energy company CEO.

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Several passing motorists called 911 shortly after 9 a.m. Wednesday to report a vehicle on fire at an underpass beneath Interstate 44 in northeast Oklahoma City.

McClendon had been indicted just hours earlier by a federal grand jury on charges of gas-lease bid rigging.

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