Skip to main content

U.S. Business Starbucks to serve beer and wine in Canada by end of year

A Starbucks store is seen in New York, in this file photo taken January 24, 2014.

ERIC THAYER/REUTERS

Fancy a glass of Pinot Grigio or a pint of cold pilsner? Soon, you won't have to look any further than your local Starbucks.

The world's largest coffee chain says it plans to serve wine and beer at some select Canadian locations by the end of the year.

The pilot program, called Starbucks Evenings, will offer customers a menu of wine, beer and small plates like olives, nuts and cheese after 4 p.m.

Story continues below advertisement

Specific locations for the program have yet to be confirmed, says Carly Suppa, a spokeswoman with Starbucks Canada.

The coffee giant first tried out the concept in one of its Seattle cafes in 2010 and has since expanded it to 30 more locations from Chicago to Los Angeles.

It's part of an aggressive push by the company to expand into a food destination rather than just a place for coffee. Starbucks already sells sandwiches, salads and specialty drinks but has been trying to capture more sales throughout the day, instead of just those seeking an early morning caffeine fix.

At select U.S. locations, customers can order from a menu of up to 10 different types of wines, including Italian Prosecco, Californian Chardonnay and Argentine Malbec. The evening menu also offers a variety of hot foods, such as chicken skewers, bacon-wrapped dates and truffle macaroni and cheese.

When the program was first launched, it was targeted towards women looking for a place to grab a quick bite to eat and a glass of wine after work without having to go to a bar or a restaurant.

"Say hello to a new way to enjoy Starbucks after 4 p.m. Drop in after work, with friends, after yoga, by yourself, after a long day or after a great day," says a promo for the menu on its website.

Starbucks says it will also launch a new bakery line in Canada called La Boulange with nine French-inspired pastries starting on March 3.

Story continues below advertisement

Founded in 1971 in Seattle, Starbucks now operates more than 20,000 stores around the world. The first Canadian location opened in Vancouver in 1987.

Report an error
Tickers mentioned in this story
Unchecking box will stop auto data updates
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Cannabis pro newsletter