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The charred remains of a house and a vehicle are shown below a derailed CSX Corp. train in Mount Carbon, West Virginia, Tuesday, February 17, 2015.

MARCUS CONSTANTINO/REUTERS

Fires burned for hours Tuesday after a train carrying 109 tankers of crude oil derailed in a snowstorm alongside a West Virginia creek, sending fireballs into the sky and threatening the nearby water supply.

Hundreds of families were evacuated and two water treatment plants were shut down after dozens of the cars left the tracks and 19 caught fire Monday afternoon, creating shuddering explosions and intense heat.

Part of the formation hit and set fire to a house, and one person was treated for smoke inhalation, but no other injuries were reported, according to a statement from the train company, CSX.

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"It was a little scary. It was like an atomic bomb went off," said David McClung, who felt the heat at his home about a kilometre uphill. He said one of the explosions sent a fireball at least 100 metres into the air.

Fire crews had little choice Tuesday but to let the tanks – each carrying up to 30,000 gallons of crude – burn themselves out.

In Ontario, Canadian National Railway Co. was still cleaning up spilled oil and removing damaged rail cars yesterday after a weekend derailment on its line at a remote site about 80 kilometers (50 miles) south of Timmins.

Patrick Waldron, a spokesman for the country's largest railway, said in an email that crews, working in -31C (-24F) weather, are allowing a controlled fire at the site to continue to burn and that crude spilled during the incident has been contained on the site. He did not say when the line, which runs between Montreal and Winnipeg, Manitoba, would return to service.

CN said 29 of 100 cars on the train heading from Alberta's tar sands to eastern Ontario derailed late on Saturday and seven caught fire. There were no injuries.

The CSX train in West Virginia was carrying volatile Bakken crude from North Dakota's shale fields to an oil shipping depot in Yorktown, Va., using model 1232 tank cars, which include safety upgrades voluntarily adopted by the industry four years ago, the Federal Railroad Administration confirmed.

However, a series of ruptures and fires in recent derailments involving model 1232s has the National Transportation Safety Board questioning their safety as well, and the Department of Transportation has drafted new standards being reviewed by the White House budget office.

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All but two of the 109 cars were tankers, and 26 of them left the tracks, the governor's spokesman Chris Stadelman said.

Some tank fires were still on fire late Tuesday morning, but federal investigators were allowed to get within 50 metres of the derailed cars, and Appalachian Power crews were cleared to repair a line and restore electricity to about 900 customers.

The cause was not immediately known. Snow was falling heavily Monday – as much as 15 centimetres in some places – but it's not clear if the weather had anything to do with the derailment, which happened about 1:20 p.m. about 50 km southeast of Charleston.

The West Virginia National Guard was taking water samples to determine whether oil seeped into Armstrong Creek, a tributary of the Kanawha River. So far, "we haven't been able to determine how much, if any, crude oil made it into the river," but there were no reports of a sheen so far, state Environmental Protection spokeswoman Kelley Gillenwater said.

CSX contractors also were monitoring the air for pollution linked to the fires, and federal railroad and hazardous materials officials were probing the accident, which prompted Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin to declare a state of emergency.

All but two of the 109 cars being hauled were tanker cars, and 26 of them left the tracks, the governor's spokesman Chris Stadelman said.

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But contrary to initial reports by responders at the scene, none of the tankers went into the water, state public safety division spokesman Larry Messina said early Tuesday.

West Virginia American Water shut down a water treatment plant about 3 miles downstream, spokesman Laura Jordan said. Another water plant downstream in the town of Cedar Grove also closed its intake but later resumed operations, Messina said.

The lack of water forced West Virginia University Tech in nearby Montgomery to cancel classes for the rest of the week.

About 85 displaced residents went to shelters set up by CSX and the American Red Cross, Messina said.

The U.S. Transportation Department has advocated tougher safety regulations for rail shipments of crude after a series of fiery train crashes, including one in Lynchburg, Va. If approved, they would phase out tens of thousands of the older tank cars increasingly carrying highly flammable liquids along waterways and through towns.

With a file from Reuters

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