Skip to main content

Construction workers form a picket line in front of a construction site Wednesday, May 24, 2017 in Montreal.

Paul Chiasson/THE CANADIAN PRESS

Quebec Premier Philippe Couillard says he will begin the process of adopting back-to-work legislation Monday if there is no agreement in the province's construction strike.

Couillard told reporters in Jerusalem on Thursday he's giving the sides the weekend to hammer out a deal.

"I have asked that the government take measures to be ready to act Monday," he said.

Story continues below advertisement

He did not want to say whether he will call back the legislature on Monday or whether the process would begin that day for the law to be tabled Tuesday.

"We won't allow the economy to be bled $45-million a day," he said, referring to the amount the strike is estimated to cost the province daily.

Word of legislation came as various marches took place across Quebec in support of the strike as it entered Day 2.

About 175,000 workers launched the unlimited general strike on Wednesday, crippling activity on major projects such as the Champlain Bridge and a Montreal superhospital.

It was not clear whether the two sides would resume negotiations Thursday after Labour Minister Dominique Vien asked them to give her a schedule of new meetings.

Work schedules, overtime and salaries are some of the main stumbling blocks in the negotiations.

Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Cannabis pro newsletter
To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies