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Signage mark the Statistics Canada offiices in Ottawa on July 21, 2010. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Sean Kilpatrick/THE CANADIAN PRESS

More women make up the top 1 per cent of earners in Canada, but they are still vastly outnumbered by men.

Women represented 22 per cent of the country's top income group in 2014 compared with 10 per cent in the early 1980s, according to a Statistics Canada's report released on Friday.

The modest increase over nearly four decades comes as more women have entered the work force and obtained higher levels of education.

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Women now make up about half of the country's labour force and have outpaced men in terms of obtaining university degrees and postsecondary diplomas, according to the latest data.

Yet only one in five high income earners was female, according to the report. To be in the top 1 per cent income group in 2014, a tax-filer earned a minimum of $225,100, according to Statscan.

The gender gap widens among the highest of earners.

Women represented 15 per cent of the top 0.1 per cent income group or those earning a minimum of $724,000 a year. And they accounted for 10 per cent of the top 0.01 per cent income group or those earning $2.7-million a year.

The report also showed that the rich have gotten richer since 1982.

The bottom half of income earners saw their share of total Canadian income decrease 28 per cent between 1982 and 2014, while the top 1 per cent's share grew 53 per cent.

With a file from The Canadian Press

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