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Need a helicopter, quick? There's an app for that

These days, New Yorkers who book a limo to get to their Hamptons retreat are just slumming it. The ride of choice for the superrich comes courtesy of an Uber-like app for ordering a helicopter ride out of town.

The service, Blade, which starts from $575 (U.S.) for bargain hunters taking the scheduled service, racked up 800 flights in 16 weeks when it launched last summer with just $50,000 in start-up capital, Business Insider reports.

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Since then, its success has prompted some big names to step up to the plate – including Google's Eric Schmidt and IAC's Barry Diller – investing $6-million in a financing deal that closed this week.

And for a few hundred extra, Blade makes it even more convenient for the 1-per-centers: "For $895 we position it so the helicopter can land 40 feet from your jet," a company representative says.

How's that for convenience?

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A very busy Mr. Li loses $14-billion in half an hour

Investors in China's Hanergy Thin Film Power took a beating on Wednesday when the Hong Kong-listed solar-energy concern lost $40-billion (U.S.) in market value in just 24 minutes.

And no one felt the pain more than Hanergy chairman Li Hejun. As controlling shareholder, he personally lost about $14-billion (U.S.) during the rout, according to Fortune.

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That number will resonate with Wal-Mart's Walton clan: Four members of the family lost a combined $6-billion on Tuesday after shares plunged on disappointing quarterly results, bringing their total net losses for the year to … $14-billion.

As for Mr. Li, his absence at the annual meeting was said to be largely behind Hanergy's collapse. In what is likely to become one of the more memorable quotes of 2015, a spokesman for the company told the FT: "Chairman Li did not attend the AGM. He had something to do."

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How much H&M is too much?

Talk about confidence in your brand. Low-price Swedish clothing retailer H&M has just opened the doors of a New York store in a move that seems like a recipe for cannibalizing its own business.

The 63,000-square-foot emporium is its biggest ever, and is in such close proximity to two other of its stores that you can actually see one of them from its windows, MarketWatch reports.

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With outlets operating within a fifth of a mile from each other in Manhattan, the discount clothier boasts a higher profile in the neighbourhood than even Starbucks.

Now that's what you call market penetration.

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Canadian company making American Dream come true

It's been 10 years since the first shovel went into the ground in the construction of American Dream, the New Jersey mega-mall that will boast the United States's first indoor ski slope and theme park.

When its original developer ran out of cash for the project, it was scooped up by Edmonton-based Triple Five Group, owner of the West Edmonton Mall, North America's largest, and Mall of America, the biggest in the U.S.

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To get the job done, the borough of East Rutherford gave the green light on Tuesday for the issuance of $675-million of municipal bonds of behalf of Triple Five, according to Bloomberg.

American Dream has generated some unwanted publicity courtesy of state governor and erstwhile traffic manager, Chris Christie. His verdict on the mall's exterior design? "It's the ugliest damn building in New Jersey."

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Zombie Survival Camp? That's a no-brainer

It can be tough finding a market niche, but when you're one of the few to run a business that caters for those preparing for the zombie apocalypse, you may be onto something.

It's just 14 days before the 2015 Zombie Survival Camp summer season kicks off, tapping into the market for corporate team-building retreats.

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This year's first camp, to be held near Bancroft, Ont., features workshops in survival skills, archery and the hand-to-hand combat art of "Zom-jitsu." The weekend is rounded out by a day of putting new skills to the test in an attack by marauding zombies.

But the camp offers more than just a corporate bonding experience. As its website says: "You can't enjoy the apocalypse if you don't survive."

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