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Apocalypse wow!

A guide to surviving doomsday like a billionaire

For the first time since the 1950s, the symbolic doomsday clock sits at two and a half minutes to midnight due to geopolitical strife, climate change, Kim Jong-un and Donald Trump. That’s got the super-rich scrambling to find ways to survive a global calamity.


For the social butterfly

$1.5 million - $3 million
Where: Somewhere in Kansas
The Survival condo was built in a converted missile silo and comes in half-floor units (900 square feet) and full-floor ones (1,800 square feet). Shared facilities include: a shooting range, pool, rock-climbing wall, dog park, movie theatre, library, classrooms, exercise facility, a high-speed elevator and military-grade security. Bonus: In case of catastrophe, a SWAT-team-style truck will pick up any owner within 400 miles.

The Survival was built in a converted missile silo

For the elitist

$5 million (but it's invitation-only)
Where: Somewhere in Europe, Argentina and Canada
The Vivos Europa One bunker gives each family two stories of space—5,000 square feet—-that can be custom outfitted (including an aquarium in the bedroom).

The bunkers are located somewhere in Europe, Argentina and Canada

For the isolationist

$4.5 million - $20 million
Where:
New Zealand
The country's isolation and lack of predators (possums and weasels are the island's biggest threats) have led America's super-rich to gobble up fertile farmland—the better to feed their families in case of Armageddon. Peter Thiel became a citizen of New Zealand in 2011 and has two properties in the country (one is worth about $13 million). James Cameron has bought huge parcels of land totalling more than 1,500 hectares since 2012.

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For the traditionalist

$4 million - $20 million
Where: Remote places in Canada and the United States
James Murdoch bought 450 acres in northern British Columbia. The property is only accessible by boat or float plan. John Malone, the largest private landowner in the U.S. has 2.2 million acres across six states. Media mogul Ted Turner has two million acres in Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico and North Dakota.


Doomsday by the numbers

1947
The Doomsday clock debuts at seven minutes to midnight

1953
U.S. and the Soviet Union test their first thermonuclear weapons within six months of each other and the Doomsday clock is at two minutes to midnight

1991
The United States and the Soviet Union sign the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty and the Doomsday clock is now at 17 minutes to midnight

2017
The Doomsday Clock is now at two and a half minutes to midnight

40%
Percentage of Americans who believe stocking up on supplies or building a bomb shelter is a wiser investment than a 401(k) says a survey by National Geographic.

700%
Rise in sales of luxury bunkers in 2016 compared to 2015

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21%
Increase in sales to foreign owners of homes in New Zealand worth more than $690,000 (U.S.)

Vivos xPoint bunkers are located near the Black Hills area of South Dakota

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