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Report on Small Business newsletter: Too many dentists, underwater farm land and lawyers split on tax changes

What to do when sales grow, but profits don't

Like any ambitious entrepreneur, Sarah Landstreet is keen to build her business. Her chief concern is that while sales continue to climb, her gross profit has been low – 18 per cent in 2016, and 19 per cent as of August. Her goal in 2018 is to triple net profits.

But she's taking a conservative approach. The business has no debt, and she wants to fund growth with profit, rather than taking on loans or more investors. Ultimately, Ms. Landstreet thinks growth will come from hiring more sales staff, pricing products more accurately and reducing costs. By cutting costs, she hopes to have the necessary funds to hire and train new sales people. Full story

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Oversupply of dentists sparks fierce competition in big Canadian cities

Like many young dentists, Ben Greff, 33, graduated from the University of Alberta's school of dentistry in 2015 already several hundred thousand dollars in debt. Full story

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Planned tax changes pit lawyers, bar association on opposing sides

Ottawa's proposed tax changes for private corporations have created a rift in Canada's legal community and are refuelling a debate over whether lawyers are public servants, based on a professional oath, regardless of what type of law they practice. Full story (Globe subscribers)

In Saskatchewan, high water washes farm profits away

For more than 12 years, farmers around east-central Saskatchewan's Quill Lakes have watched the waters rise and their profits fall from flooding that shows no signs of stopping. And as nature takes its toll on the bottom line, their very way of life is under threat, too. Full story

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A plan for handover of your business can pay for itself many times over

While building their businesses, entrepreneurs are usually not thinking about their end game. "You're at the beginning of your company. You're presumably in a good place with your business partner. Planning for its end is not something you want to focus on," says Shabnam Weber, owner of Toronto-based Academy of Tea, which offers educational courses about tea and a tea-sommelier certification program. Full story

Calgary Mayor Naheed Nenshi risks losing city's small businesses

There is a growing discontent among small-business owners in Calgary these days and that sentiment may find its way to the city's ballot boxes on Oct. 16. Full story

AI startup Deep Genomics lands financing as it aims to 'flip medicine on its back'

A high-profile Toronto startup looking to use artificial intelligence to discover new drugs for genetic disorders has landed a $13-million (U.S.) private financing led by Silicon Valley venture capitalist firm Kholsa Ventures. Full story

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'Come with an open mind': the people who live at work

Communal living is growing popular with freelancers and business owners happy to network round the dinner table Full story

Why Uber's fate could herald backlash against 'digital disruptors'

Are Silicon Valley's giants at last being reined in by the regulators? Full story

Why loyalty-card programs should just die

Three ways to build customer trust without stamp cards Full story

TheBoardlist releases list highlighting top Canadian women in tech

Since theBoardlist launched in April, the organization — a database including the names of women willing to join company boards — has grown endorsements by 30 percent, candidates by 23 percent, and has seen a total of 13 companies using the platform. Full story

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