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From Toronto to Calgary, the following ten companies represent some of the county’s trailblazers

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Thanks to 'e-cool-logical' ways of thinking, small businesses across the country are making a splash globally. In fact, Canada has become an epicenter for setting environmental standards for other countries. From Toronto to Calgary, the following ten companies represent some of the county's trailblazers:

1. SunOpta: Based in Brampton, Ont., SunOpta prides itself on "bringing well-being to life" through natural, organic and specialty foods. From soy milk, to protein bars and almost everything in-between this company has made its mark internationally with a presence in approximately 60 countries.

2. Pure + Simple: Organic beauty products are all the rage and Pure + Simple, headquartered in Toronto, is leading the trend with a line of skin care and beauty products created from all-natural, organic Canadian ingredients. Its products contain no petroleum, chemical fragrances, colours, or preservatives.

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3. ECHOage: A philanthropic party planning service based out of Toronto knows how sometimes the last thing parents want are more toys for their children. At an ECHOage party, instead of bringing gifts, guests contribute to a child's chosen charity and participate in group gift giving for one big meaningful item versus 10 to 15 smaller ones that are likely to be discarded.

4. Boemar: Boemar an international company based in Toronto developed a simple to use, cost effective tool that eliminates the need to call the plumber for a simple clogged drain. Drain-FX harnesses the power of water to unclog drains, instead of harmful chemicals.

5. Champion Pet Foods: Your four-legged friends deserve quality food and Champion Pet Foods provides it. Based in Edmonton, Champion is an independent pet food maker of biologically-appropriate pet food created using fresh, Canadian ingredients. The line is designed to nourish dogs and cats using only ingredients that are sustainably raised.

6. Innocent Earth: Calgary-based Innocent Earth provides one of Canada's largest selections of sustainable fashion for expecting moms. Their apparel not only helps to improve the quality of life for new mothers, but is great for the environment too.

7. All Things Being Eco: This is a one stop shop for green home décor items that won't break the bank. The company, based out of Chilliwack, B.C., brings innovative and high-quality organic, recycled, biodegradable and fair trade products to those looking for furnishings great for the home and the planet too!

8. Grassroots Environmental Products: Toronto-based Grassroots brings a large variety of sustainable, low impact products to the marketplace all while guiding people towards environmentally-responsible lifestyles. Grassroots is a winner of the Green Toronto Award of Excellence.

9. Real Green: This Kitchener-based company specializes in offering eco-friendly and safe solutions for cleaning needs.

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10. Green Beaver: From soap and shampoo to deodorant and lotion, Green Beaver, based in Hawkesbury, Ont., provides an eco-friendly solution to keeping harmful chemicals out of your body.

Lacy Gambee is a former television news producer, a publicist, and busy mother of two. After years of working in the television news industry, she made the switch to public relations and enjoys writing about business, family, travel, and food.

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