Skip to main content

How can you make your customers feel like working with you is a much-needed vacation?

SCOTT AUDETTE/REUTERS

While on a mini-vacation to the "happiest place on earth," I began looking at every aspect of Disneyland as a learning opportunity to improve my business. Why is it that Disneyland is "the happiest place on earth," and how can you translate that experience into your startup?

From an employee standpoint to customer perspective, Disneyland is a win-win engagement empire. Here are six helpful hints to get your business to a whole new world, too.

Create an experience worth waiting for. If you're on a visit to Disneyland, you're committed to waiting up to an hour and a half for a single five-minute ride. This is primarily because both the expectation of the experience and the experience itself are unique, engaging and above expectations. Aim for a customer experience that covers those three bases, and you're well on your way.

Story continues below advertisement

Manage expectations. At the start of every ride, you're notified how long you can expect to wait. In some cases, wait times are longer than ideal. Have processes in place to help manage how you notify your clients of wait times.

Incorporate happiness. From ride attendants to cashiers, every employee at Disneyland seems to truly believe they are in "the happiest place in the world." On this most recent trip, I noticed that the employees seemed genuinely interested in my happiness, and they were very attentive. This struck me as unusual. And when I asked how they were doing, they responded without hesitation that they love working at Disney. Are your employees showing such love for your company? Are they truly excited to be a part of your business?

Bring experience to life. Every part of Disneyland showcases attention to detail. You feel as if you are really in the magical worlds they created. Employees are dressed appropriately to themes, and there is continuity from rides to landscaping to socks. This is one thing that makes the experience so special. Do your customers have WOW experiences? What sets you apart?

Celebrate the small stuff. It's a celebration at Disneyland at all hours. Are you celebrating? Have you created a fun environment for your employees and customers?

Consistency is key! This is another aspect of managing expectations. When your customers know what to expect, and can trust that their experience will be consistent, it will add to the overall "magic" of working with you. This is paramount for stable, growing, strong business, no matter the market.Sometimes it's easy to lose sight of how fun it can be to have a great business interaction. From the infectious laugh of the barista at the corner coffee shop that makes your latte just a bit sweeter, to the friendly customer service person over the phone, little details make all the difference. Remember that if your customers can trust your word, your product is consistent, and there's a little magic in the experience, you'll transport them to new levels of happiness with you.

Nicole Smartt is the vice-president and co-owner of Star Staffing. She was awarded the Forty Under 40 award, recognizing business leaders under the age of 40. In addition, Nicole co-founded the Petaluma Young Professionals Network, an organization dedicated to helping young professionals strive in the business world.

The Young Entrepreneur Council (YEC) is an invite-only organization comprised of the world's most promising young entrepreneurs. In partnership with Citi, YEC recently launched StartupCollective, a free virtual mentorship program that helps millions of entrepreneurs start and grow businesses.

Story continues below advertisement

Follow Report on Small Business on Pinterest and Instagram
Join our Small Business LinkedIn group
Add us to your circles
Sign up for our weekly newsletter

Report an error
Tickers mentioned in this story
Unchecking box will stop auto data updates
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Cannabis pro newsletter
To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies