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In Pictures: Avoid these classic mistakes when hiring first employee

It's a classic mistake for entrepreneurs to hire somebody just like themselves," says Jenifer Bartman, principal of Jenifer Bartman Business Advisory Services in Marjo Johne’s article ‘Jumping from solo act to employer is a big step’

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Jenifer Bartman, principal of Jenifer Bartman Business Advisory Services works with Phil Bernardin, CEO of Eascan Automation, in his manufacturing facility in Winnipeg Thursday October 11, 2012

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Finding someone who has good chemistry with the business owner is critical, she says in Marjo Johne’s article, ‘Jumping from solo act to employer is a big step’

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“Instead of hiring someone who can diversify the skill set you have in your business, you've just hired someone who will duplicate what you do and focus on the same things you prefer to focus on,” she says.

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“It's a classic mistake for entrepreneurs to hire somebody just like themselves,” she adds.

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Small businesses typically work on shoestring budgets, so they need to make sure their first hire will translate to improvements in their bottom line, says Ms. Bartman.

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Employers should bring in someone who will complement their skills and fill in knowledge gaps.

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For example, a business owner who's good in sales but poor in planning may want to hire an employee who's strong in strategy.

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Ms. Bartman holds meeting with Mr. Bernardin in his manufacturing facility in Winnipeg Thursday October 11, 2012

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