Skip to main content

Kevin Van Paassen/Kevin Van Passen/The Globe and Mail

The hostile bid for Afexa Life Sciences Inc. , maker of Cold-FX, is getting more and more hostile.

Shareholders of Afexa can't depend on the company to deliver on its promises, the head of hostile bidder Paladin Labs argues.

Afexa last week said that Paladin's 55-cents-a-share bid undervalues the company's growth opportunities. But Mark Beaudet, Paladin's co-founder and acting head, says that the target hasn't proved that it can turn those promises into revenue.

Story continues below advertisement

"If you look at their record across those assumptions, it's not very good," Mr. Beaudet said, while pointing out that Afexa's shares have been slumping for five years, while Paladin's have been soaring.

Afexa's revenues have been flat, it has been promising to get into markets outside Canada but "other than a failed launch of Cold-FX in the United States in 2006-2007, Afexa's only reported progress has been the sale of 'small amounts' of Cold-FX in Hong Kong," Paladin said Monday. And while the company has brought on new products, "six years later these products do not contribute significantly to the company's revenues," Paladin said.

So, if the Afexa is so stagnant, why bother buying it?

Mr. Beaudet said Paladin wants it because it would quickly ramp up the growth of its over-the-counter treatment business, which currently has $20-million in sales. Afexa would add about $40-million with a brand that, while mature, "has a great following in Canada."

Afexa said last week that it has a list of potential white knights that could top Paladin's bid.

Mr. Beaudet said that he sees factors that will limit the list of rival bidders, and they include the fact that Cold-FX is largely sold in Canada alone, that it's an over-the-counter product and because there's not much growth in Cold-FX at the moment.

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Tickers mentioned in this story
Unchecking box will stop auto data updates
Comments

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • All comments will be reviewed by one or more moderators before being posted to the site. This should only take a few moments.
  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed. Commenters who repeatedly violate community guidelines may be suspended, causing them to temporarily lose their ability to engage with comments.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.
Cannabis pro newsletter