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Streetwise newsletter: British-Canadian businessman buys stake in Bay Adelaide Centre ; Fairfax to invest another $250-million in Seaspan

A Bay Street sign is seen in Toronto’s financial district.

Mark Blinch/The Globe and Mail

Here are the top reads,

Property transaction: Victor Dahdaleh, a British-Canadian businessman who was charged but acquitted in an international bribery case, has paid $850-million for part of an office complex in the heart of downtown Toronto. Story (Rachelle Younglai and Stephanie Chambers, for subscribers)

Shipping: Fairfax Financial Holdings Ltd. is doubling its investment in Seaspan Corp. as the container ship company seizes a bigger market share with the purchase of a Chinese fleet owner. Story (Eric Atkins, for subscribers)

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FINANCIAL SERVICES WRAP

Regulators: The U.S. government has filed criminal and civil charges against a former Equifax Inc executive over alleged insider trading linked to last year's massive data breach at the credit reporting company, officials said on Wednesday. Story

Cryptocurrencies: Alphabet Inc's Google said on Wednesday it will ban advertisements for cryptocurrencies and related content starting in June. Story (for subscribers)

DEAL WRAP

Toy sector: MGA Entertainment Inc. is trying to organize a group of fellow toymakers to make a bid for the Canadian operations of Toys "R" Us Inc., the industry giant that appears to be headed toward liquidation. Story

Mining sector: First Cobalt Corp. is seeking to speed up its timetable to begin producing cobalt, riding the wave of interest in the metal used in electric-vehicle batteries and smartphones. Story

Chips sector: Singapore-based Broadcom Ltd withdrew its US$117-billion bid to acquire Qualcomm Inc on Wednesday, two days after U.S. President Donald Trump blocked the attempt citing national security concerns. Story

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Fund: Cambridge Innovation Center (CIC), which provides coworking space for startups, has closed a US$58 million round of funding from European real estate developer HB Reavis (HBR). VentureBeat

Fintech: Credit Karma, the credit-checking startup that's valued at over US$3 billion, has acquired a young personal finance company, Penny, the companies tell Recode. Recode

Software sector: Luminate Capital Partners has acquired ecMarket Inc., dba Conexiom, a Vancouver-based provider of cloud-based supply chain document automation software solutions. Private Capital Journal

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT

Here is our annual Big Deals series about financing and investment banking.

Innovation: Data scientists, physicists, mathematicians and behavioural economists. Meet the new deal team. As buyout multiples have climbed and capital piles up in private investment funds, acquirers have been looking for a competitive edge in their hunt for acquisitions. For some firms, that has meant doing more advanced data analysis in an effort to better understand, value and integrate a business into their portfolio. And that is bringing computer science and M&A communities closer than ever. Story (Jacqueline Nelson, for subscribers)

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Pot sector: It has been a busy six months of dealmaking for legal cannabis companies. The sector ended the last year with a bang after a quiet third quarter, as companies raised a record $900-million in equity in the last three months of 2017, according to data compiled by Canaccord Genuity Corp. Story (Christina Pellegrini, for subscribers)

Utilities: Canadian utilities and pipeline companies spent the past two years on an $80-billion shopping spree in the United States, their hunt aided by low interest rates and their own high-priced stocks. Story (Jeffrey Jones, for subscribers)

Real estate: China's restrictions on foreign real estate purchases sharply slowed Chinese investment in Canadian offices, hotels and other large properties late last year – even before Beijing's dramatic seizure of Anbang Insurance Group, whose buying spree had driven up prices. Story (Rachelle Younglai, for subscribers)

Activists: At first glance, the latest data on activist investors make no sense. On one hand, there's never been more capital deployed by sharp-elbowed fund managers in their battles against public companies. Story (Andrew Willis, for subscribers)

Deal machine: As Alberta's traditional corporate giants grapple with volatile oil and gas prices, a small but powerful company with roots in Red Deer is emerging as one of the province's future stars. In the span of three years, Parkland Fuel Corp. has become a dominant force in the retail gas market, now owning and operating more than 1,800 service stations across Canada. Story (Tim Kiladze, for subscribers)

Bought deals: Junior mining companies are increasingly turning to senior firms for capital, as traditional bought-deal financing becomes a riskier gambit in a difficult market for commodity plays. Story (Niall McGee, for subscribers)

Bonds: The maple bond market rebounded last year to levels not seen in nearly a decade, as a flurry of foreign companies tapped the Canadian-dollar debt market for cash. Story (Alexandra Posadzki, for subscribers)

Cross border: Canadian companies spent a good deal less money swallowing up foreign firms last year, but there are early hints they will be hungrier to do cross-border deals in 2018. Story (James Bradshaw, for subscribers)

The winners: Here are the Canadian Dealmakers award winners for 2017. Story

Rankings: Annual league tables for investment banking and M&A law firms Tables (for subscribers)

Deals: The largest mergers and acquisitions of 2017 Table

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