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Streetwise Newsletter: RBC ‘too big to fail,’ maple syrup deals on tap for Rogers Sugar

People walk by a Bay Street sign at the financial district in Toronto, October 10, 2008. REUTERS/Mark Blinch

© Mark Blinch / Reuters/Reuters

Royal Bank of Canada has officially joined the ranks of global banks deemed 'too big to fail.' Story (James Bradshaw)

Canada's largest bank is joining global tech giants in setting up a research lab in Montreal to take advantage of the city's growing artificial intelligence expertise. Story

Rogers Sugar Inc. has been a consolidator in the tightly controlled maple-syrup business. More deals look to be on tap. Story (Jeffrey Jones, for subscribers)

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Independent investment bank GMP Capital Inc. has lost two of its key mining bankers. Story (Nial McGee, for subscribers)

DAILY DEALS

Rio Tinto, Canada's Wealth Minerals and Chinese private equity firm GSR Capital are considering a bid for a stake in Chilean lithium producer SQM, banking sources told Reuters. Story

AT&T Inc is likely to emerge victorious from a legal fight with the United States Department of Justice over its $85.4-billion (U.S.) acquisition of Time Warner Inc, analysts said in a series of research notes on Tuesday. Story

YO! Sushi, a portfolio company of Mayfair Equity Partners, has acquired Markham, Ontario based Bento Sushi from Ken Valvur, Bento's Executive Chairman, and Glenn Brown, President & CEO of Bento. Financial terms were not disclosed. Story (Private Capital Journal)

Boku, a United States-based carrier billing company, listed on the London Stock Exchange's Alternative Investment Market (AIM) recently, selling £45 million in stock. The flotation is interesting, given where Boku is based, how much it had previously raised and from whom and how much it is worth post-IPO. Story (Techcrunch)

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT

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Aurora Cannabis Inc. says it is forging ahead with plans to launch a hostile takeover bid to acquire CanniMed Therapeutics Inc., a move that would create Canada's second-largest medical-cannabis company behind Canopy Growth Corp. Story (Christina Pellegrini, for subscribers)

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