Skip to main content

Ryan Smolkin says he dreamed up the idea for Smoke’s Poutinerie – the first food joint ever to focus solely on poutine – more than a decade ago. He points to his upbringing in the Ottawa Valley, which borders La Belle Provence, as partially to blame for his love affair with the traditional Quebecois dish.

Rosa Park/The Globe and Mail

The owners of Smoke's Poutinerie say they are pursing a rapid global expansion while also branching out with new restaurants that would sell gourmet hot dogs and burritos.

Toronto-based Smoke's Eaterie says it plans to open 1,300 restaurants around the world by 2020 devoted mainly to fans of poutine – the quintessential Quebec fast-food favourite of french fries topped with gravy and smothered in cheese curds.

After just six years, 100 franchised Smoke's Poutineries have opened in Canada, mainly in Ontario. The company says its goal is to double that footprint in Canada by adding locations mainly in Ontario, Quebec and Western Canada.

Story continues below advertisement

Company founder and CEO says growth will be targeted in non-traditional venues like sports arenas, university and college campuses and amusement parks.

The global expansion plans are centred heavily on the United States, where the company hopes to have 800 stores within five years.

The first U.S. location in Berkeley, Calif., opened in December and will soon be joined by restaurants in Hollywood and Las Vegas.

Smoke's also looks to open 150 restaurants in Western Europe, Australia and the Middle East.

While the focus is on Smoke's Poutinerie, the company is also branching out with Smoke's Burritories and Smoke's Weineries. By fall, 15 new Mexican-inspired and 10 hot dog restaurants are expected to open in Canada, joining the first Weinerie in the Halifax community of Dartmouth that opened in December.

Hot dog toppings would include peanut butter, jelly, chipotle pulled pork and garlic chips, while classic burritos would be topped with items like roasted corn, black beans, rice and chorizo sausage.

Follow us @GlobeSmallBiz and on Pinterest and Instagram
Join our Small Business LinkedIn group
Add us to your circles
Sign up for our weekly newsletter

Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Discussion loading ...

Cannabis pro newsletter