Skip to main content
//empty //empty

A U.S. company that has sold a speedy potting method to nurseries for decades has expanded its customer base to cannabis growers, many of whom aim to sow three annual crops in the same cultivation spaces and need to plant thousands of young clones throughout the year.

Tennessee-based Bouldin and Lawson LLC’s EP-2200B equipment fills pots up to 10 gallons (38 litres) with a set amount of soil and then drills an exact space for cannabis clones to be planted.

“Everything is planted at the same consistent depth,” said Jim Fowler, territory manager for Bouldin and Lawson, about the US$30,000 equipment.

Story continues below advertisement

“You get a more uniformed growth because of the numbers you can produce at the same time.”

The potter can fill and drill 200 pots an hour per person, he said.

Workers need to be there to take the pots off the conveyer belt once they are filled with a precise quantity of soil and then plant the cannabis clone in the space that has been drilled. The equipment’s variable speed can be increased to accommodate more helping hands or slowed down accordingly.

Bouldin has been in operation since the 1950s and its EP-2200 has been used in nurseries for decades.

“We sell this same unit to greenhouses and nurseries all over the United States,” said Mr. Fowler, adding the company expanded its customer base to cannabis producers around 2013 and has since branched out globally.

Building and Lawson’s EP-2200 potter on display at MJBizCon in Las Vegas in December 2019.

Marcy Nicholson

Follow related topics

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies