Skip to main content
Access every election story that matters
Enjoy unlimited digital access
$1.99
per week for 24 weeks
Access every election story that matters
Enjoy unlimited digital access
$1.99
per week
for 24 weeks
// //

Reapi Ulunisau of Fiji scores a try during match against Canada on July 29, 2021.

ANDREW BOYERS/Reuters

Canada’s quest for another medal in women’s rugby sevens got off to a roaring start Thursday morning as the Canadian squad routed Brazil 33-0 in the opening match of the group play stage for both teams.

Things went quite differently for Canada on Thursday evening as they dropped their second match to Fiji 26-12.

In the early game, veteran captain Ghislaine Landry led a balanced scoring attack for the Canadians, making four out of five conversion attempts and adding a try for 13 points.

Story continues below advertisement

Canadian women’s rugby sevens team says it is in a better place after off-field upheaval

“I’m pretty happy with that first performance,” Landry said.

“It’s been such a build up … We’re just so happy to be on the field playing together.”

Olympic rookie Keyara Wardley, who came in as a substitute for the second half, added 10 points on a pair of tries, while Charity Williams and Karen Paquin had a try each.

In the late game, Fiji was dominant against a Canadian squad that looked flat-footed in the first half. The Fijians led 21-0 at the break.

The second half was a more balanced contest, but the damage was done and Canada fell to 1-1.

The Canadians wrap up their group play schedule against France on Friday morning. The French side is undefeated after victories over Fiji and Brazil on Thursday.

The Canadian women, led by Landry, earned a bronze medal in the first Olympic appearance for rugby sevens at the Rio Games in 2016.

Story continues below advertisement

Both teams brought terrific energy to the pitch to start Thursday’s opener, and the first half was a mostly even affair, with only Williams crossing the goal line. Landry’s first successful conversion made it 7-0 Canada at halftime, and it was all Canada from there.

“At halftime we just talked about really going 100 per cent and I think you saw that in second half,” said Landry.

Thursday marked a debut of sorts for Canada coach Mick Byrne, a 62-year-old Australian national with a diverse CV that includes rugby league, rugby union and Aussie Rules Football.

After the game, Landry had high praise for the new coach.

“You know he’s one of the best rugby coaches in the world. His knowledge is second to none. So we were so fortunate that he was able to step in and help us get here and I think elevate our game,” she said.

Byrne took over the Canadian women after John Tait stepped down in April after an independent review of a formal complaint by former and present players under Rugby Canada’s harassment and bullying policy.

Story continues below advertisement

The review found that, while the conduct described in the players’ complaint reflected the experiences of the athletes, it did not fall within the policy’s definition of harassment or bullying.

Tait said the complaints were “all unfounded,” but resigned as sevens head coach and women’s high-performance director.

Sign up for The Globe’s Olympic newsletter and follow all of the news, features and opinion in the lead-up to the Summer Games in Tokyo.

Your Globe

Build your personal news feed

  1. Follow topics and authors relevant to your reading interests.
  2. Check your Following feed daily, and never miss an article. Access your Following feed from your account menu at the top right corner of every page.

Follow topics related to this article:

View more suggestions in Following Read more about following topics and authors

This content appears as provided to The Globe by the originating wire service. It has not been edited by Globe staff.

Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

If you do not see your comment posted immediately, it is being reviewed by the moderation team and may appear shortly, generally within an hour.

We aim to have all comments reviewed in a timely manner.

Comments that violate our community guidelines will not be posted.

UPDATED: Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies