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Sports Chelsea Carey rink registers two wins at world women’s curling event

Calgary skip Chelsea Carey shown delivering a rock at the Scotties Tournament of Hearts at Centre 200 in Sydney, N.S. on Feb. 24, 2019.

Andrew Vaughan/The Canadian Press

Canada’s Chelsea Carey rebounded nicely Sunday at the world women’s curling championship.

The Calgary skip won both of her matches after opening the tournament Saturday with a 7-6 loss to Korea. Carey scored four in the fifth end en route to an 8-5 win over Germany’s Daniela Jentsch before earning a close 8-7 decision over Latvia in the later draw.

“It certainly didn’t come easy,” said Carey. “Today was a big day for us, we needed to bounce back after [Saturday].

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“This was a battle all the way, but who cares? How you win the game doesn’t matter once you’re 2-1. We needed that, and we’ll need to continue to get better as we go along. Hopefully we’ll be a little more precise [Monday].”

Deuces in the seventh and ninth end were crucial for Canada (2-1), which took an 8-6 lead into the 10th end. Latvia (0-3) scored one but that’s as close as it would get.

Against Germany, the fifth end proved pivotal for the Canadians.

“It was huge to go out there and get some confidence,” vice-skip Sarah Wilkes said. “It’s massive for our team ... to get out there and have an idea of what the ice is doing and be a little more comfortable out there, less stressed, it’s definitely huge for our confidence.

“It’s a huge relief. Being at our first women’s worlds for the three of us [Wilkes, second Dana Ferguson and lead Rachel Brown] and getting that first win for Canada, it felt really great.”

Canada trailed 2-1 through four ends after the Germans registered a steal of one when Carey was wide with her last-rock tap attempt. But the Canadians dominated the fifth with eight perfectly executed shots, the last being Carey’s wide-open hit for four after Jentsch’s last-rock freeze attempt bounced into the open.

“We were due for eight [made shots],” Carey said with a smile. “When you make eight shots, good things happen, especially when you have the hammer.

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“That was a big turning point in the game, obviously.”

And effectively erased any lingering disappointment from the Saturday night loss.

“Losing the first game isn’t that big of a deal as long as you respond properly,” Carey said. “You’re going to lose games this week. Nobody will go undefeated.

“But you want to try to not lose two in a row at any point. We were just a little bit off [against Korea], so we wanted to come out today and be just that tiny bit better. The first half, we weren’t quite there, but in the second half we got the communication going, we started reading the ice a little better and everything just got tighter, more precise, and that’s what we needed.”

The Canadians will play twice Monday. They’ll take on Japan’s Seina Nakajima (2-1) before facing Finland’s Oona Kauste (0-3).

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