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All-Star Game anthem singer says O Canada giggle caused by ‘excitement’

The National Anthem is played during the MLB baseball All-Star Game, Tuesday, July 11, 2017, in Miami.

Wilfredo Lee/AP

Canadian pop singer Jocelyn Alice says she giggled while singing O Canada before Tuesday's MLB all-star game because she was "overcome with excitement."

Calling the experience one of the best days of her life, the Calgary native tweeted Wednesday that she saw some fellow Canadians on the big screen and got caught up in the moment, prompting her to laugh.

"I love my country," she tweeted. "I'm so proud to be Canadian."

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Alice was widely criticized for her performance by social media users, who seized on the fact Blue Jays first baseman Justin Smoak seemed to give her a disapproving glance after she giggled. He later said he didn't notice her laugh.

It wasn't the first time O Canada triggered controversy at all-star baseball games.

Remigio Pereira of The Tenors attracted plenty of online fury at last year's game in San Diego when he sang, "We're all brothers and sisters, all lives matter to the great," instead of, "With glowing hearts we see thee rise, the True North strong and free."

Pereira left The Tenors months later after the other members of the quartet said he'd acted as a "lone wolf."

In 2009, a recorded version of O Canada was played at St. Louis's Busch Stadium instead of a live performance before Sheryl Crow sang the American anthem.

Alice is known for her songs "Jackpot" and "Bound to You."

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