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The Toronto Blue Jays acquired relief pitcher Adam Cimber as part of a trade with the Miami Marlins on Tuesday.

Mary Holt/The Associated Press

The Toronto Blue Jays acquired injured outfielder Corey Dickerson and reliever Adam Cimber in a trade Tuesday with the Miami Marlins.

Miami obtained infielder Joe Panik and minor league reliever Andrew McInvale.

Dickerson is sidelined with a bruised left foot and is expected to be in a walking boot for at least two more weeks. He is batting .260 with two homers and 14 RBIs.

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“He’s going to be a good addition,” Blue Jays manager Charlie Montoyo said Tuesday before Toronto began a three-game series against the Mariners in Buffalo. “We have a right-handed lineup, and to add him to the lineup, a left-handed bat like that, it’s going to help us a lot.”

Montoyo is familiar with Dickerson from their time together in Tampa Bay. Dickerson was an all-star for the Rays in 2017, when Montoyo was a bench coach.

“He’s a gamer,” Montoyo said. “He’s one of those guys that is always dirty because he plays the game the right way. He plays hard. It’s all about getting him healthy now.”

Jesus Sanchez had taken over in left field during Dickerson’s absence.

“We definitely look at this as a move about today and the future,” Marlins general manager Kim Ng said Tuesday before Miami opened a three-game series in Philadelphia.

“We need to look at Jesus Sanchez as a piece of this. We got sped up in the process in terms of bringing Jesus up after the month he had in Triple-A. When we saw Jesus and saw how he’s handling it up here, we felt more comfortable in trading Corey Dickerson. Jesus being able to take that spot at this point was part of the equation.”

The sidewinding Cimber has a 2.88 ERA in 33 games. He is expected to join the Blue Jays in Buffalo on Tuesday, Montoyo said.

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“He is going to help our bullpen a lot,” Montoyo said. “He gives us a different look. So I’m really looking forward to adding him to the group. And just like everybody else, he is going to get a chance to pitch in high leverage.”

Panik is batting .246 with two homers and 11 RBIs.

McInvale has a 2.55 ERA in 15 games at Class A and Double A.

“Joe is a guy who has experience, versatility,” Ng said. “We think he’ll be a great fit.”

As part of the trade, the Blue Jays will send the Marlins: US$2,652,884 in equal payments of US$1,326,442 on Sept. 3 and Oct. 3.

That money will offset some of the salary difference. Dickerson is owed US$4,387,097 from an US$8.5-million salary, Cimber US$447,419 from a US$925,000 salary and Panik US$954,839 from a US$1.85-million salary.

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The deal could be the first of several before the trade deadline for the Marlins, who are last in the NL East. Toronto is third in the AL East.

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