Skip to main content

Kelsey Lalor leads Canada in 18-1 rout of Dominican Republic at women’s World Cup

Kelsey Lalor belted a two-run homer in the first inning to lead Canada to an 18-1 victory over the Dominican Republic on Sunday at the women’s baseball World Cup.

Lalor’s homer was one of 17 hits by the Canadians, who advanced to the event’s super round. Canada (4-1) outscored opponents 42-16 in the opening round, collecting 62 hits in the process for an average of over 12 a game.

“Obviously we’re very happy with the way we’re swing the bats right now,” said Canadian manager André Lachance. “We also know that once the super round starts that the games get tighter, but it is [the offence] a positive for sure.”

Story continues below advertisement

Canada will open the super round on Tuesday against a yet-to-be-determined opponent with opening round games still to be played on Monday. The super round features the top three seeds in each group playing crossover games before bronze and gold medal matchups are played on Friday.

After adding two more runs in the second, Canada sent 16 batters to the plate in the third, scoring 12 runs including four RBIs from Ashley Stephenson – courtesy of a double and triple – while Nicole Luchanski and Mia Valcke each drove in two runs.

Seven different players in the Canadian lineup recorded multihit games including Stephenson and Niki Boyd, who had three apiece.

The Dominican Republic led 1-0 after a half inning of play but Canadian starting pitcher Emma Carr shut them down the rest of the day and finished with five strikeouts to earn the win.

“Emma was great for us today,” Lachance said. “Her effort allowed us to rest our bullpen, and with tomorrow’s off-day will benefit us with the potential of four games in four days.”

Report an error
Comments

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • All comments will be reviewed by one or more moderators before being posted to the site. This should only take a few moments.
  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed. Commenters who repeatedly violate community guidelines may be suspended, causing them to temporarily lose their ability to engage with comments.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.
Cannabis pro newsletter