Skip to main content
Canada’s most-awarded newsroom for a reason
Enjoy unlimited digital access
$1.99
per week
for 24 weeks
Canada’s most-awarded newsroom for a reason
$1.99
per week
for 24 weeks
// //

The Atlanta Braves have fired manager Fredi Gonzalez, who couldn’t survive the worst record in the majors.

Alex Brandon/The Associated Press

The Atlanta Braves on Tuesday fired manager Fredi Gonzalez, who couldn't survive the worst record in the majors.

Braves general manager John Coppolella confirmed the firing of Gonzalez. This was Gonzalez sixth season with the Braves, who are in the midst of a dismal stretch: They have lost two straight and eight of 10, have baseball's worst record at 9-28 and already are 13 1/2 games out of first place in the NL East.

Brian Snitker, who has been manager of the Braves' Triple-A Gwinnett team, will move up as interim manager. Snitker was Atlanta's third-base coach from 2006 to 2013, also following Gonzalez in that role when Gonzalez was named manager of the Marlins.

Story continues below advertisement

Snitker also had two stints with Atlanta as the bullpen coach in 1985 and from 1988 to 1990.

The Braves also fired bench coach Carlos Tosca. Gwinnett pitching coach Marty Reed has joined the club as bullpen coach. Terry Pendleton will move from first base coach to bench coach and Eddie Perez will move from bullpen coach to first base coach.

Gonzalez, 52, replaced Hall of Fame manager Bobby Cox, who retired following the 2010 season. Gonzalez was the only Latino manager in the majors and he is the first Braves manager to be fired since Russ Nixon in 1990.

The Braves won the NL East with 96 wins in 2013 but fell to 79-83 the following season.

Since then, the Braves have shifted to rebuilding mode, seeking young pitchers in a series of moves that stripped the roster of such established veterans as Justin Upton, Jason Heyward, Andrelton Simmons, Craig Kimbrel and Shelby Miller.

Expectations were low this season as the Braves set their focus on moving into their new SunTrust Park in 2017. Even so, it was clear Coppolella and team president John Hart didn't expect to have the worst record in the majors.

The Braves lost their first nine games. They had a brief recovery with four straight wins but haven't been able to put together another winning streak. They lost two of three at Kansas City to open a 10-game road trip and also lost Monday night's series opener at Pittsburgh, 8-5.

Story continues below advertisement

Gonzalez was hurt by especially poor play at home. The Braves are 2-17 at Turner Field.

Gonzalez was 434-413 with the Braves. He was 276-279 in four seasons with the Marlins.

The Braves were competitive through the first half of the 2015 season, posting a 42-42 mark. Injuries and trades helped fuel a free-fall for a 67-95 finish, and the poor results continued this season.

The poor start led to increased questions about Gonzalez's status, and he recently addressed the uncertainty.

"Nothing is for sure in our business, so you hold your head up, make good decisions and go forward and see what happens," he said.

Gonzalez also recently said he worried he wouldn't survive the slow start to see a turnaround when more young players are ready for the majors.

Story continues below advertisement

"My biggest concern is you go through these lumps, you see these young guys come in and then you get let go, you get dismissed, and the guys are here the next year and they're winning everything," Gonzalez said.

"But again, this is a cruel business and it's part of our job."

Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

If you do not see your comment posted immediately, it is being reviewed by the moderation team and may appear shortly, generally within an hour.

We aim to have all comments reviewed in a timely manner.

Comments that violate our community guidelines will not be posted.

UPDATED: Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies