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New York Mets outfielder Jay Bruce circles the bases after hitting a home run in a game against the Colorado Rockies at Coors Field in Denver, Colorado, on Aug. 2, 2017.

Matthew Stockman/Getty Images

Hours after putting All-Star Michael Brantley on the disabled list, the Indians acquired veteran outfielder Jay Bruce from the New York Mets on Wednesday night for minor league pitcher Ryder Ryan.

Bruce, who is hitting .256 with 29 homers and 75 RBIs for the Mets, will give Indians protection while Brantley recovers from an ankle injury. It's not known how long Brantley might be out with an injury sustained on Tuesday night.

The Mets are 11 games under .500 for the first time in three years and were eager to unload Bruce, who has $13 million salary this year and can become a free agent after the World Series. Cleveland will pay the $3,765,027 remaining of Bruce's salary.

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New York is 16 1/2 games behind Washington in the NL East. Bruce was acquired from Cincinnati at last year's trade deadline.

Bruce will report to the Indians this weekend in Tampa.

The 30-year-old is a three-time All-Star and two-time Silver Slugger Award winner. This season, he's played 91 games in right field and 11 games at first base.

With Bruce, Cleveland manager Terry Francona and the defending AL champions have another proven bat who may be able to help them win their first World Series title since 1948. Cleveland lost Game 7 in last year's Series to the Chicago Cubs and leads the AL Central.

Ryan will be assigned to Columbia of the Class A South Atlantic League. He was 3-4 with six saves and a 4.79 ERA in 33 games for Class A Lake County of the Midwest League.

While Major League Baseball's trade deadline was July 31, a player can be dealt if he goes through waivers unclaimed.

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