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Denver Nuggets' Jamal Murray (27) drives to the basket against Cleveland Cavaliers' Cedi Osman (16) during the second half of an NBA basketball game, Friday, Feb. 19, 2021, in Cleveland.

Tony Dejak/The Associated Press

Not himself of late, Jamal Murray got a lecture from Nuggets coach Michael Malone about being more aggressive and not passing up open shots.

He listened – and launched.

Murray scored a career-high 50 points and became the first player in NBA history to get that many without trying a free throw as Denver adjusted to a schedule change by handing the Cleveland Cavaliers their ninth straight loss, 120-103 on Friday night.

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Following the game, Murray was unaware that he had done something unique.

“I was just making my shots,” he said nonchalantly between sips of a postgame smoothie. “It’s kind of cool to make history. It’s a cool stat.”

Murray was cooler than cool. While All-Star starter Nikola Jokic added a triple-double on his birthday, it was Murray’s night.

The smooth guard made 21 of 25 shots, including 8 of 10 3-pointers and scored 30 in the second half. He added six rebounds and two steals during 38 electrifying minutes.

“To do it as efficiently as he did it is really remarkable,” said Malone. “That’s an incredible stat line.”

With the Cavs still hanging around in the fourth, Murray made three 3-pointers in a 65-second span to push Denver’s lead to 21. He celebrated his third straight long-range make – an off-balance number from 33 feet – to open the fourth by pounding his chest and screaming toward fans in Rocket Mortgage FieldHouse.

“That’s what we live for as players,” Murray said, “that atmosphere.”

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Murray scored Denver’s first 13 in the last quarter, and then passed his previous career best of 46 points by draining another 3 – on Jokic’s 10th assist – with 4 minutes left. Murray capped his incredible performance with a resounding dunk before being replaced with 2:23 left.

Collin Sexton scored 23 and Jarrett Allen 20 for Cleveland, which had a couple days to prepare for the Nuggets but still couldn’t stop them.

Not the way Murray was shooting.

The Cavs tried several different defenders on Murray, who was hardly bothered.

“It never matters,” he said.

After a strong start, the Cavs have fallen near the bottom of the Eastern Conference standings.

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“With the exception of Murray, we took some steps in the right direction,” Cavs coach J.B. Bickerstaff said.

Michael Porter Jr. added 22 points for the Nuggets. Jokic celebrated turning 26 with 16 points and 12 rebounds in getting his seventh triple-double this season.

A stopover in Cleveland was not originally part of Denver’s travel itinerary for a four-game trip. However, when the league postponed three San Antonio games – including one against the Cavs on Wednesday – earlier this week because of virus cases on the Spurs, the Nuggets were rerouted.

They made their first 12 shots, opened a 22-point lead in the second half and then let Murray close out the Cavs.

The Nuggets thrashed the Cavaliers on Feb. 10, beating them by 38 points and prompting Bickerstaff to criticize his players for being “embarrassed.” He expected a better effort in the rematch between the teams.

“I hope our guys respond,” he said 90 minutes before tip.

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Cleveland played better, but didn’t have enough firepower to stay with the Nuggets.

Or Murray.

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