Skip to main content

Toronto Raptors guard Kyle Lowry (right) and head coach Dwane Casey walk off the court at the end of their 103-95 loss to the Charlotte Hornets in NBA action in Toronto Thursday January 8, 2015.

Frank Gunn/THE CANADIAN PRESS

The Toronto Raptors' current six-game stint back home in the comfy Air Canada Centre may seem bland compared with the team's recent daunting road stretch versus some of the NBA's glamour squads, but it presents some captivating tripwires.

Toronto has just begun a homestand against what may seem like mostly hum-drum Eastern Conference foes. The stretch may have once looked like a chance for the reeling Raptors to catch their breath, but now it seems laced with snares.

It began Thursday with a loss to Kemba Walker and the 14-24 Charlotte Hornets, a team that has now beaten the Raptors in their past five meetings.

Story continues below advertisement

The man sitting No. 5 in scoring among NBA point guards came in on three straight 30-point games and threatening his penchant for recent game-winning shots.

Next up is the 12-21 Boston Celtics – in theory a chance for a much-needed win. Then the surging Detroit Pistons visit on Monday, the NBA's hottest team of the moment, despite a 12-23 record. Detroit is on a seven-game winning streak since waiving Josh Smith, toppling giants such as the Dallas Mavericks and San Antonio Spurson the road behind Andre Drummond and Greg Monroe.

Then the lowly 5-29 Philadelphia 76ers visit, two days before the mighty 27-8 Atlanta Hawks – but not the same Hawks who visited back in October and gave Toronto a happy opening-night victory. This is now the white-hot squad that recently stole the Eastern Conference lead from the Raptors. Then comes the New Orleans Pelicans – the lone West visitor in this stint – along with their superstar, Anthony Davis.

"Home won't take care of you," said Raptors coach Dwane Casey. "You have to take care of home."

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Comments

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

If your comment doesn't appear immediately it has been sent to a member of our moderation team for review

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.