Skip to main content

Sports Coffey gets his day as jersey officially retired

Paul Coffey wiped away tears last night as his No. 7 jersey was elevated to Edmonton Oilers immortality in a ceremony marked by the sound of trumpets, the streaming of confetti, the flashing of lights in a darkened rink and the deafening roar of fans chanting his name.

"All I can say is it's great to be an Oiler," said Coffey, standing at centre ice with his family as a banner bearing his sweater number was raised to the rafters before a game between the Oilers and the Phoenix Coyotes. "I'll always consider myself to be an Oiler and Edmonton to be my home."

It was the first time Oilers great Wayne Gretzky, coach of the Coyotes, had returned to Edmonton as a bench boss.

Story continues below advertisement

The Oilers have already retired Gretzky's jersey along with those of Jari Kurri, Grant Fuhr and Al Hamilton.

All were at centre ice with Coffey during the ceremony that began with the 44-year-old Hall of Fame defenceman, dressed in his vintage blue Oilers uniform, taking a victory lap in a spotlight around the rink as fans delivered a standing ovation.

The Coyotes then spoiled the party, however, by beating the Oilers 4-3 in overtime on a goal by defenceman Derek Morris.

The Oilers rallied in the third period like the Oilers of old, erasing a two-goal disadvantage to tie the game 3-3. But a penalty taken by Oilers defenceman Steve Staios late in regulation gave the Coyotes a man advantage in the overtime, setting the stage for Morris's power-play marker.Earlier yesterday, 500 fans jammed the main atrium at Edmonton's city hall to honour Coffey as city officials proclaimed it Paul Coffey Day.

He ended his career as the 10th leading scorer in NHL history with 396 goals and 1,135 assists in 1,409 regular-season games. He is second only to Ray Bourque in points by a defenceman.

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Cannabis pro newsletter