Skip to main content
The Globe and Mail
Support Quality Journalism.
The Globe and Mail
First Access to Latest
Investment News
Collection of curated
e-books and guides
Inform your decisions via
Globe Investor Tools
Just$1.99
per week
for first 24 weeks

Enjoy unlimited digital access
Enjoy Unlimited Digital Access
Get full access to globeandmail.com
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
var select={root:".js-sub-pencil",control:".js-sub-pencil-control",open:"o-sub-pencil--open",closed:"o-sub-pencil--closed"},dom={},allowExpand=!0;function pencilInit(o){var e=arguments.length>1&&void 0!==arguments[1]&&arguments[1];select.root=o,dom.root=document.querySelector(select.root),dom.root&&(dom.control=document.querySelector(select.control),dom.control.addEventListener("click",onToggleClicked),setPanelState(e),window.addEventListener("scroll",onWindowScroll),dom.root.removeAttribute("hidden"))}function isPanelOpen(){return dom.root.classList.contains(select.open)}function setPanelState(o){dom.root.classList[o?"add":"remove"](select.open),dom.root.classList[o?"remove":"add"](select.closed),dom.control.setAttribute("aria-expanded",o)}function onToggleClicked(){var l=!isPanelOpen();setPanelState(l)}function onWindowScroll(){window.requestAnimationFrame(function() {var l=isPanelOpen(),n=0===(document.body.scrollTop||document.documentElement.scrollTop);n||l||!allowExpand?n&&l&&(allowExpand=!0,setPanelState(!1)):(allowExpand=!1,setPanelState(!0))});}pencilInit(".js-sub-pencil",!1); // via darwin-bg var slideIndex = 0; carousel(); function carousel() { var i; var x = document.getElementsByClassName("subs_valueprop"); for (i = 0; i < x.length; i++) { x[i].style.display = "none"; } slideIndex++; if (slideIndex> x.length) { slideIndex = 1; } x[slideIndex - 1].style.display = "block"; setTimeout(carousel, 2500); } //

Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Chase Claypool scores his fourth touchdown of an NFL football game on a 35-yard pass play from quarterback Ben Roethlisberger during the second half in Pittsburgh on Oct. 11, 2020.

Don Wright/The Associated Press

The text message Steelers wide receiver Chase Claypool received from quarterback Ben Roethlisberger on Friday couldn’t have been more direct.

“I just told him just keep doing what you’re doing and you’re going to have a big game,” Roethlisberger said.

A historic one, too.

Story continues below advertisement

The Canadian-born Claypool scored four touchdowns, including the clincher on a 35-yard dart from Roethlisberger with 2:59 to go, and the Steelers remained unbeaten with a 38-29 victory over the Philadelphia Eagles on Sunday.

The 22-year-old second-round pick out of Notre Dame dashed into the end zone on a two-yard jet sweep in the first quarter, sprinted away from defenders on a 32-yard catch-and-run in the second, danced across the goal line on a five-yard wide receiver screen in the third and finished off Philadelphia in the fourth when Roethlisberger audibled to a play Claypool had never run before, at least while lined up in the slot.

At the snap, however, the 6-foot-4, 238-pounder from Abbotsford, B.C., never hesitated, racing past overmatched Eagles linebacker Nate Gerry and into the end zone.

“We changed the play,” Roethlisberger said. “I can’t say enough about Chase getting down the middle of the field and make a play for us.”

Claypool became the first Steelers player to score four times in a game since wide receiver Roy Jefferson did it in 1968. He’s also the first rookie since at least 1950 to catch three touchdowns and add another on the ground, and the first Canadian to have three receiving touchdowns in one game since Joe Rooney of the Duluth Eskimos on Oct. 23, 1927, six years before the Steelers were established and more than seven decades before Claypool was born.

“It is definitely insane, it’s crazy,” said Claypool, who hauled in seven passes for 110 yards and added six yards rushing on three carries. “But I don’t really like to think about breaking records or making history. It’s super cool but it’s not something I go into the game thinking `I’m going to try to make history today.'”

The Steelers (4-0) needed every one of them after nearly squandering a 17-point third-quarter lead while letting the Eagles (1-3-1) convert 10 straight third downs.

Story continues below advertisement

Carson Wentz threw for 258 yards and two scores to go with two interceptions and moved Philadelphia in position to take the lead with just more than three minutes to play. Jake Elliott’s 57-yard field-goal attempt drifted right, however, and Roethlisberger turned to Claypool one last time.

Pittsburgh took over and a personal foul facemask by the Eagles pushed the Steelers into Philadelphia territory. Facing third-and-eight from the Eagles' 35, Claypool – who’d had a touchdown earlier in the quarter called back owing to what he called an “awful” offensive pass-interference call – listened to Roethlisberger’s instructions and found himself against the smaller, slower Gerry. Next thing he knew Roethlisberger was looking his way – again – and he was in the end zone.

Again.

“You’ve got to make those plays,” Claypool said. “[Roethlisberger] is trusting you. He’s putting the ball where it needs to be. You make the plays and the trust builds faster.”

Your Globe

Build your personal news feed

  1. Follow topics and authors relevant to your reading interests.
  2. Check your Following feed daily, and never miss an article. Access your Following feed from your account menu at the top right corner of every page.

Follow topics related to this article:

View more suggestions in Following Read more about following topics and authors
Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies