Skip to main content
//empty //empty

An XFL football is seen on the field before a game between the Dallas Renegades and St. Louis Battlehawks, at Globe Life Park, on Feb. 9, 2020.

USA TODAY USPW/USA TODAY Sports via Reuters

Former wrestler and Hollywood actor Dwayne Johnson teamed up with ex-wife Dany Garcia and investment company RedBird Capital Partners to buy the XFL for US$15-million, hours before the bankrupt American football league was set to be auctioned.

They were selected as the winning bidder for “substantially all of the assets of Alpha Entertainment LLC” – parent company of the XFL.

The XFL, a reboot of the 2001 league of the same name, had filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in April, a month after it had to cancel the remainder of its inaugural season because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Story continues below advertisement

“We are grateful for today’s outcome. This is a Hollywood ending to our sale process and it is an exciting new chapter for the league,” XFL president and chief operating officer Jeffrey Pollack said in a statement on Monday.

“[They] are a dream team ownership group and the XFL is in the best possible hands going forward.”

The transaction is subject to bankruptcy court approval at a hearing on Friday.

The brainchild of Vince McMahon, the XFL 2.0 was the second attempt by the World Wrestling Entertainment chief executive to provide an NFL alternative to American football fans.

Popularly known as The Rock, Johnson is famous for his roles in popular movie franchises such as the Fast & Furious and Jumanji.

“With gratitude and passion I’ve built a career with my own two hands and will apply these callouses to our @xfl2020 brand,” Johnson wrote on Twitter. “Excited to create something special for the fans!”

The 48-year-old was a college football player at the University of Miami who went undrafted in the 1995 NFL Draft before he eventually switched to wrestling.

Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies