Skip to main content

Trevor Harris, the CFL’s leading passer this season, has been placed on the one-game injured list and will miss Friday’s tilt against the Hamilton Tiger-Cats.

Jeff McIntosh/The Canadian Press

The Edmonton Eskimos will be missing their starting quarterback on Friday night.

Trevor Harris, the CFL’s leading passer this season, has been placed on the one-game injured list and will miss Friday’s home game against the Hamilton Tiger-Cats.

Backup Logan Kilgore is slated to make his first career start for Edmonton.

Story continues below advertisement

Harris suffered an upper-body injury in the Eskimos’ last game on Sept. 7 against Calgary.

Harris will become the eighth of nine CFL opening-day starting quarterbacks to miss at least one game because of injury.

The only quarterback to have played in every one of his team’s games so far will be Mike Reilly of the B.C. Lions.

For Kilgore, this will be just his second regular-season game at quarterback in almost three years.

Kilgore’s first and only other appearance at QB with the Eskimos (6-6) came when Harris left early in the second quarter of a 33-17 loss to the Calgary Stampeders with an injury to his throwing arm on Sept. 7.

Kilgore stepped in and went 21-for-28 passing for 242 yards.

Pressure? Not to hear Kilgore tell it.

Story continues below advertisement

“There’s no substitute for game experience,” Kilgore said when asked if coming in for Harris in Calgary takes some of the edge off facing Hamilton. “The more you can get, the more comfortable you feel and, more importantly, the more comfortable the guys around me feel.

“There’s subtle differences, trying to emulate everything cadence-wise and just communication-wise Trevor does. Luckily, we’ve been working hard all year just (in case) this would happen.”

While Kilgore, who holds on field goals, took reps at quarterback in both of Edmonton’s pre-season games, his relief appearance in Calgary was his first in a regular-season game since Oct. 2, 2016 as a member of the Toronto Argonauts. He came in for Drew Willy in a 38-11 loss to Montreal.

“It came down to watching Trevor throw the ball and knowing he wasn’t quite ready to play this week,” coach Jason Maas said. “We were trying to give him as many days off as possible knowing that’s what he needs. He needs time.

“It wasn’t up to par or up to snuff, so we decided to just shut him down and go with Logan. He (Harris) couldn’t go. I mean, that’s the thing. It didn’t matter what the game was. Trust me, this game is important.”

After stops as a backup with Toronto and Hamilton from 2014 to ’17, Kilgore spent 2018 coaching junior college in California. He accepted an invitation to camp from Edmonton last winter.

Story continues below advertisement

“It’s a great opportunity,” Kilgore said. “It’s funny because to the outside looking in, it’s basically if you haven’t played in a game, you haven’t played, but for anybody that’s in this building, you practise in football way more than you play games, right?

“In high school, it might be 10 games and you’re practising year-round. College, you get 12 to 14 if you go to a bowl game. We get 18 up here regular season and then more, so I feel like going against our defence every day in practice, they’re as good as it gets, in my opinion. We practise with such high intensity. I think that has really paid dividends for me.”

If the Eskimos are to have any hope of catching Calgary and Saskatchewan, both 8-4 and tied for second place in the West Division, they can’t afford a fourth straight loss to begin the stretch drive. How much of that stretch drive involves Kilgore as the starter remains to be seen, but it begins with the Ticats.

“I think that’s the life of a backup quarterback or the second quarterback on a team,” Maas said. “They’re in the wings waiting and their job is (to) be ready in case of emergency or opportunity.

“You’ve got to be ready and I think Logan has done a tremendous job of that.”

Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Cannabis pro newsletter