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B.C. Lions wide receiver Arland Bruce III takes a break during a practice in Vancouver, Friday, Nov. 25, 2011.

Ryan Remiorz

The Supreme Court of Canada will not hear the case of a former Canadian Football League star who wanted to sue the league over concussion trauma.

Two lower courts in British Columbia dismissed the suit filed by Arland Bruce III, saying the Supreme Court previously ruled that unionized employees must use labour arbitration — not the courts — to resolve disputes that arise from their collective agreement.

Bruce started in the CFL with the Winnipeg Blue Bombers in 2001 and finished his career in 2014 as a member of the Montreal Alouettes after stints with the Toronto Argonauts, Hamilton Tiger-Cats and B.C. Lions.

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He argued he sustained "permanent and disabling" repetitive head trauma as a player.

In court documents, Bruce says he continues to suffer post-concussive symptoms, including depression, paranoia, delusions and other medical issues.

As usual in decisions on leaves to appeal, the Supreme Court gave no reasons for refusing to hear the case.

When Canadian bull rider Ty Pozzobon killed himself in January 2017, he turned a spotlight on the world’s most dangerous sport. He became bull riding’s first confirmed case of CTE. The Globe spent the summer with Pozzobon’s closest colleagues on the professional bull-riding tour to explore how a way of life threatens the health and safety of the men who love to ride.
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