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Woods finally got in on the low-scoring action after bogeys on four of the first six holes with an impressive turnaround that even he couldn’t explain.

Christian Petersen/Getty Images

The crowd was roaring, the birdies were dropping and Tiger Woods looked like his vintage self for the final 12 holes of the U.S. Open.

The problem for Woods was what happened on the first 60 holes.

Woods salvaged an otherwise disappointing weekend at Pebble Beach by birdieing six of his final 12 holes on Sunday to finish the tournament at two-under par, far behind the top contenders on a weekend made for low scores.

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Woods finally got in on the action after bogeys on four of the first six holes with an impressive turnaround that even he couldn’t explain.

“I wish I would have known because I would have turned it around a little earlier than that," he said. ”Again, got off to another crappy start and was able to fight it off. Turned back around and got it to under par for the week which is — normally it’s a good thing, but this week the guys are definitely taking to it.“

The final round of 69 tied for Woods’s second-best closing round ever at a U.S. Open, behind only the 67 at Pebble Beach in 2000 when he had a record-setting 15-stroke win.

After starting the year by winning his first major since 2008 at the Masters, Woods missed the cut at the PGA Championship last month and finished far out of the lead at the U.S. Open.

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