Skip to main content

Mark Stone tried something new on Saturday and it paid off.

Stone scored his second goal of the game at 2:30 of overtime as the Ottawa Senators overcame a 3-1 deficit to defeat the Montreal Canadiens 4-3 on Saturday.

“New curve tonight so I was putting it to the test and it worked,” Stone said.

Story continues below advertisement

“I’ll be honest with you, I was getting pretty tired. I had one chance to try and finish it and I took it.”

Stone’s one-timer from the face-off circle beat Carey Price for the game winner.

“He’s a better shooter than he thinks he is, I know that,” Duchene said of Stone’s shot.

“He’s a big guy, a big strong guy, long stick and he hammered that one so it was great to see.”

Stone had a goal and an assist in regulation while Mikkel Boedker and Matt Duchene also scored for the Senators (4-2-1). Craig Anderson made 24 saves.

The Canadiens (4-1-2) got first-period goals from Paul Byron, Max Domi and Phillip Danault. Carey Price made 30 saves.

Price stopped Chris Tierney on a breakaway in overtime while Ryan Dzingel had another opportunity to give the Senators the win moments earlier but the puck rolled off his stick while he had an empty net to shoot at.

Story continues below advertisement

The Canadiens led 3-1 entering the second period but a pair of goals from the Senators, including one on the power play, levelled the teams at 3-3 heading into the third.

“We didn’t move the puck well late in the game and we had a lot of unforced errors,” Canadiens coach Claude Julien said, turning aside talk that his team was tired.

“We didn’t have a morning skate (Saturday) so there is no reason for anyone to be tired.”

Boedker scored his second of the season as he popped one over the shoulder of Price from the goal line at 9:41 cutting the Canadiens lead to 3-2.

A little more than two minutes later Duchene scored his first of the season as he completed a three-way passing play and beat Price with a quick shot while the Senators were on the power play.

“We hung in there. The goalie made some big saves in the second period to keep it at 3-1 and then we got a big power-play goal from (Boedker),” Stone said.

Story continues below advertisement

In the opening period the Canadiens build a 2-0 lead with the game barely four minutes old.

Domi got his second of the season on the power play at 3:40 and Danault scored at 4:05 to get the Canadiens off and running.

“We played a good first period. All four lines played well and we had them on the ropes,” Byron said.

“The second and the third we just didn’t play well. There were a lot of mistakes mentally. They were pushing on us and forechecking and we weren’t generating any offence and playing way too much in our own zone.”

Stone got one back for the Senators at 7:14, taking advantage of a turnover deep in the Montreal end.

“There were some mistakes from us but a lot of that had to do with the way they came out. We knew that was the best that we had and the Stoney got that big goal to get us back to within one. We kept the game close and sometimes that’s the key until you can fight back,” Duchene said.

Story continues below advertisement

The Canadiens restored the two-goal cushion before the end of the period as Byron scored his fourth of the season at 16:07.

Notes: Nick Paul and Mac McCormack were scratches for the Senators while Nikita Scherbak, Victor Mete and Charles Hudon were scratches for the CanadiensMatt Duchene scored his first goal of the season in his seventh game, ending the longest scoring drought of his career to start the seasonThe Senators will host the Boston Bruins on Tuesday. Montreal will next see action on Tuesday as well when the Calgary Flames visit the Bell Centre.

Report an error
Comments

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • All comments will be reviewed by one or more moderators before being posted to the site. This should only take a few moments.
  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed. Commenters who repeatedly violate community guidelines may be suspended, causing them to temporarily lose their ability to engage with comments.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.
Cannabis pro newsletter