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Dale Weise scores against Boston Bruins goalie Niklas Svedberg (72) on a penalty shot during second period National Hockey League action Thursday, November 13, 2014 in Montreal.

Ryan Remiorz/The Canadian Press

Stoicism's thread is woven deeply into the fabric of hockey, you can still complain just not too loudly or with great insistence.

In light of the result that would follow a few hours later, Boston Bruins coach Claude Julien's gentle remonstration about the rigours of his team's schedule might seem like sour grapes.

That interpretation risks obscuring a valid point.

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After providing only token resistance against the Toronto Maple Leafs on Wednesday (a 6-1 loss), the Bruins faced their most hated rivals one night later; it didn't go well, it's not every day you see a visiting fan throw a team shirt on the ice in disgust.

The back-to-back situation is one both Boston and the Montreal Canadiens will face 15 times this season, only five teams will play more games on back-to-back nights.

"All four games [against Montreal this season] are back-to-back," Julien noted. "I don't make the schedule, I'm disappointed in having to play on the second night of back-to-backs – with big rivalries like that you'd rather have both teams as fresh as possible to give the best game possible. Unfortunately that's not something we control, so you move on."

In the NBA, star performers feel no compunction about pointing out the flaws in the schedule – last month LeBron James, Dirk Nowitzki and other players publicly kvetched about the demands of playing a tightly-packed run of games – but that kind of talk is much rarer in hockey.

For a league that trumpets its rivalries – see NBCSN's promotions for Wednesday night games – it's an issue that might be worth paying closer attention to.

It's not to say there weren't any flashpoints in Montreal's 5-1 win, in the third minute of the game Montreal winger Dale Weise slammed Boston centre Gregory Campbell hard into the boards, leading to a one-sided scrap and cheers from the home crowd.

It will be especially galling to the Bruins that Weise, who later chipped in a goal and an assist, was the key to their undoing.

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After all, last spring he was at the centre of some handshake-line nastiness with Boston hard case Milan Lucic, whose last appearance in Montreal saw him fined $5,000 (U.S.) for making a rude gesture to fans as he was led away to the penalty box.

On this night, Lucic was booed every time he touched the puck although he kept his temper in check – when defenceman P.K. Subban came in to defend teammate Jiri Sekac (flattened moments earlier by the big Bruins winger), he accepted a couple of cross-checks and did nothing.

The crowd response was predictable; it would appear that in the matter of the Bell Centre denizens versus Lucic, there can be no amicable resolution.

It would have been dumb for Lucic to take the bait, but for a player who admits to thriving on the emotion of confrontation he was oddly peripheral and largely uninvolved.

All of which suggests something is amiss.

For the Bruins, already shorn of their top offensive centre (David Krejci) and most dominant blueliner (Zdeno Chara) through injury, the margin was always going to be thin against the Habs.

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In the first period, the Bruins were clearly the better team – taking a 1-0 lead when Dougie Hamilton fired his third goal of the season (and ninth point in the nine games he's had to play without Chara).

Were it not for some heroics from Carey Price, who parried a point-blank Seth Griffith shot and made an outrageous pad save to deny Daniel Paille, the damage could have been worse (although Niklas Svedberg, subbing in for regular Boston goalie Tuukka Rask, he of the dismal record in Montreal, denied Max Pacioretty on a breakaway at the end of the frame).

Then the needle hit 'E' in the second, and it all got very messy for the visitors.

Weise, whose last goal came against Boston in Game 7 of the second round last spring, was awarded a penalty shot 2:31 into the frame after being dragged down as he steamed in on a breakaway.

He scored through Svedberg's legs. With the Habs buzzing – they would out-shoot Boston 15-5 in the period – Lars Eller scored his third goal in as many games at the 13 minute mark, rifling a backhand into the top shelf.

Less than two minutes later, Weise turned provider, setting up Pacioretty for a one-timer in the slot.

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He would add another on a deflection play in the third, and the Habs' dormant power play would later score for the first time in 29 chances, Jiri Sekac blowing around Adam McQuaid and firing an unstoppable wrist shot.

You know it's not your night when Montreal gets one on the man advantage.

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