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Canadian hockey legend Paul Henderson holds the Team Canada jersey he wore when he scored the winning goal during the 1972 Summit Series against the Soviet Union at his office in Mississauga June 7, 2010. Henderson authenticated the jersey, which he has not seen in more than 38 years, and is being auctioned by its U.S. owner on June 22. Several corporations are bidding on the jersey and the Canadian federal government has offered funding if the winning bid is from a Canadian museum. Henderson would like to see the jersey go to the new Canada's Sports Hall of Fame in Calgary.

MIKE CASSESE/MIKE CASSESE/REUTERS

Once again, Paul Henderson is credited with making hockey history.

A Montreal-based auction house says it's received a certificate from Guinness World Records about the jersey Mr. Henderson was wearing when he scored the winning goal in the 1972 Summit Series against the Soviets.

Classic Auctions says they have been informed that Guinness has classified it as the most expensive hockey jersey ever sold at auction.

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The winning bid came in at $1.275-million two years ago.

Marc Juteau, president of Classic Auctions, says he was actually told by the Guinness people that they can't find a comparable scenario for any auction, in any sport. He says the item was listed in a special hockey category as a matter of caution, to ensure accuracy.

The famous No. 19 jersey was sold to Toronto real-estate magnate Mitchell Goldhar.

Mr. Henderson's tie-breaking goal came in the last minute of the eighth and final game. Canada won the series 4-3, with one tie.

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