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Vania Grandi was named the new president and CEO of Alpine Canada on Tuesday.

Grandi is the first woman to lead Alpine Canada. She was a member the Canadian national ski team along with her younger brother, four-time Olympian Thomas Grandi, and sister Astrid.

"I am absolutely thrilled with the opportunity to follow my passion and focus my efforts on supporting Canada's athletes and the broader ski community," said Grandi. "Leading Alpine Canada brings my career full circle and it is a dream come true. Now I want to contribute to helping our athletes, coaches and parents realize their dreams too."

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After she left ski-racing, Grandi started her career as a reporter for the Associated Press in Rome, Italy in 1992. She worked for the AP in Rome for eight years followed by a year in Salt Lake City. She went on to be media relations and communications manager for the 2002 Salt Lake City Winter Olympics. In 2005, after earning an MBA, Grandi joined the global mining firm Rio Tinto, where she held several senior positions.

Grandi succeeds Mark Rubinstein, who served as CEO and president of Alpine Canada for the past four years.

"Mark has done an outstanding job of bringing Alpine Canada to where we are now, and we know he's going to contribute significantly to his next endeavours," said Martha Hall Findlay, chair of Alpine Canada's board. "Alpine Canada is now in a position to target the next level in performance and we are so excited that Vania will be joining us.

"She is someone who built on her ski racing experience to achieve extraordinary business and career success. Not only are we confident that she will do great things for Alpine Canada, she also provides a terrific role model to our athletes."

She officially assume the post on Jan. 1 and will relocate to Calgary, where the organization is based.

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