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Pyeongchang 2018: Canada adds to medal haul with gold in speed skating, silver in luge

PYEONGCHANG 2018

What you missed on Day 6 of the Winter Olympics

Left to right: Silver medalist Jorrit Bergsma of the Netherlands, gold medalist Ted-Jan Bloemen of Canada and bronze medalist Nicola Tumolero of Italy celebrate during the victory ceremony after the speed skating men’s 10,000m.

What you missed

For today's Olympic guide, please go here

  • Canadian speedskater Ted-Jan Bloemen won gold in the men’s 10,000m
  • Canada won silver in the luge team relay, giving the group redemption after a fourth-place finish in Sochi
  • Canadian pairs figure skaters Meagan Duhamel and Eric Radford won the bronze medal in the pairs free skate event
  • The Canadian women’s hockey team defeated the U.S. 2-1, and will next play in the semifinals. The men’s team handily beat Switzerland 5-1 to start its campaign.
  • As hockey gets under way, Russian hockey players struggle with the fact they can’t call themselves Team Russia




What’s happened so far


Speed skating (Men’s 10,000m)

Canadian speedskater Ted-Jan Bloemen defeated his rival Sven Kramer of the Netherlands to win the 10,000-metre event. It was Bloemen’s second medal of the Winter Games, having captured the silver in the 5000m. In that event, the Dutch legend Kramer dispatched Bloemen to add to his medal haul. This time around, though, Kramer faded down the stretch and Bloemen’s gold was all but guaranteed with several laps remaining.


Luge (team relay)

The Canadian luge relay team captured silver, getting edged by Germany. It’s the second medal of these games for Alex Gough, who won bronze in the women’s event. For the team — which also includes Sam Edney, Tristan Walker and Justin Snith — it’s been a roller-coaster couple of months. In December, it appeared they may be gaining an Olympic bronze medal after two Russians had their results from the 2014 Games nullified. But the decision was overturned a few weeks later by the Court of Arbitration for Sport, meaning Canada’s fourth-place finish four years ago would likely stand. Today the team got its redemption.

Men’s ice hockey (Canada vs. Switzerland)

The Canadian men’s hockey team got off to a rollicking start Thursday, defeating Switzerland 5-1. Rene Bourque and Wojtek Wolski scored two apiece for Canada, while Maxim Noreau added another. Canada will next play the Czech Republic. In other men’s Olympic hockey action, Finland defeated Germany 5-2, Sweden blanked Norway 4-0, and the Czech Republic survived a close 2-1 affair with South Korea.

Curling (Women’s)

The Canadian women’s side got off to a tough start with two close losses in round-robin play. Rachel Homan’s team fell 8-6 to EunJung Kim of South Korea and 7-6 in an extra end to Sweden’s Anna Hasselborg on Thursday. Down 5-4 in the ninth end against the Koreans, Homan attempted an aggressive shot rather than drawing for one. The move backfired with Kim stealing a big three points for an 8-4 lead. Homan fell to 0-2 when the Swedes, with the hammer, drew to the button with their final stone for a point in the extra end. (Canadian Press)


What’s coming up

All times Eastern


  • 8:00 p.m. Feb. 15: Figure skating (Men’s free skate)
  • 9:00 p.m. Feb. 15: Alpine Skiing (Women’s super-G)
  • 1:00 a.m. Feb. 16: Cross-country skiing (Men’s 15km individual)
  • 6:00 a.m. Feb. 16: Speed skating (Women’s 5,000m)



In case you missed it



More from The Globe


  • At the Olympics, North and South Korea unite against a common foe, Japan, writes Nathan Vanderklippe

Follow The Globe in Pyeongchang


With files from Canadian Press

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