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Olympics Pyeongchang 2018: Parrot, McMorris win Canada’s first medals of the Games in men’s slopestyle

PYEONGCHANG 2018

Max Parrot, Mark McMorris win Canada's first medals of the Games in men's slopestyle

Silver medalist Max Parrot of Canada, gold medalist Redmond Gerard of the United States and bronze medalist Mark McMorris of Canada pose during the victory ceremony for the Snowboard Men’s Slopestyle Final.

What you missed

  • For today’s Olympic guide, please go here
  • Canadians Max Parrot and Mark McMorris won a silver and bronze in men’s slopestyle while American Redmond Gerard came away with gold.
  • Canada’s Kaitlyn Lawes and John Morris clinched first in round-robin play in mixed doubles curling after defeating South Korea’s Hyeji Jang and Kijeong Lee 8-3 to finish the round robin 6-1.
  • Defending Olympic champion Charles Hamelin came up short in the men’s short track 1500m. Canada’s Samuel Girard finished just off the podium in fourth



What you missed on Feb. 10


Snowboard (Men's slopestyle final, Women's slopestyle qualifying)

Canadians Max Parrot and Mark McMorris won a silver and bronze in men's slopestyle with American Redmond Gerard coming away with gold. Gerard, the 17-year-old from the United States, put up a 87.16 in his final run after struggling in his first two opportunities. Parrot, who led through qualifying, bobbled during his first and second runs but pulled off a clean run on his last chance to win silver. McMorris, who suffered a tragic injury in the run up to the Games, finished in third with a 85.20.Tyler Nicholson of North Bay, Ontario finished just off the podium and ended with a 76.41, which he scored in his second run. Sebastient Toutant of L'Assomption, Quebec was close to pulling off a comeback in his third and final run but fell on his last jump. Toutant finished with a 61.08.

The women's slopestyle qualifications get under way Saturday night, where Spencer O'Brien will look to improve on her 12th-place finish in Sochi. The 29-year old from Alert Bay, B.C. won gold at the 2016 X Games, but was forced to withdraw in 2017 after spraining her ankle. Laurie Blouin has been cleared to return to the slopes after suffering an apparent head injury during a training session earlier this week at Phoenix Park. (11:30 p.m.)

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Short track speed skating (Men's 1500m)

Charles Hamelin wasn't able to defend his Olympic crown in the men's 1500m. Hamelin was penalized in the final, while Canadian Samuel Girard finished in fourth. Lim Hyojun of South Korea won gold, followed by Sjinkie Knegt of the Netherlands and Semen Elistratov of the Olympic Athletes from Russia.

Short track speed skating (Women's 500m)

Canada's women started strong in the opening heats of the 500m. Three-time Olympic silver medallist Marianne St-Gelais cruised to victory in her heat; Kim Boutin also qualified for the next round. The quarter-finals get under way on Feb. 13.

Curling (Mixed doubles)

Canada's Kaitlyn Lawes and John Morris clinched first in round-robin play in mixed doubles curling on Sunday at the Pyeongchang Olympics. The Canadians beat South Korea's Hyeji Jang and Kijeong Lee 8-3 to finish the round robin 6-1. Lawes and Morris dropped the first game of the tournament to Norway 9-6 on Thursday before reeling off six straight victories.

-Canadian Press

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Speed skating (Women's 3000m)

Dutch speed skaters got their campaign off to a blistering start with a clean sweep of the medals in the women's 3,000 metres at the Winter Olympics on Saturday as Carlijn Achtereekte edged out defending champion Ireen Wust to claim gold.

Canada's Ivanie Blondin and Isabelle Weidemann finished sixth and seventh, respectively.

-Reuters

Women's ice hockey (Korea vs. Switzerland)

Canada's women's hockey team doesn't begin defence of its gold until Sunday, but Saturday's game between the unified Korean team and Switzerland had a Canadian flavour. The Korean squad, which comprises players from both North and South Korea, is coached by Canadian Sarah Murray and Canadians Danelle Im and Caroline Park are on the roster. However, that wasn't enough to overcome the Swiss side, which thrashed the Korean team 8-0.

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The Globe's Nathan VanderKlippe recently spoke with an Austrian superfan of the North Korean women's hockey team, who called the idea of a joint team 'a nonsense idea.'


What's happening on Day 2/3


  • 2 a.m.: Speed skating (Men’s 5000m)
  • 7 a.m.: Freestyle skiing (Women’s moguls final)
  • 7:10 a.m.: Women’s ice hockey (Canada vs. Russia)
  • 8 p.m.: Snowboard (Women’s slopestyle final)
  • 8 p.m.: Figure skating (Team event: men’s and ladies free skate, free dance)



In case you missed it



More from The Globe


  • No NHLers, no problem for Canada’s goaltenders, who are comparing notes to get a picture of their opponents, Grant Robertson writes
  • With the absence of NHL players in Pyeongchang, a shadow lifts from the underappreciated, writes Cathal Kelly
  • From speed skating success to a surprising hockey surge, the Olympic host country dreams of podium glory, Nathan VanderKlippe writes
  • Canada assembles dream team to vault Virtue, Moir to podium in final Olympics, Grant Robertson writes
  • ’One step closer to peace’: At Olympic opening ceremony, an image of peace that could prove ephemeral, Nathan VanderKlippe writes

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With files from Canadian Press

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